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Not sure if this is the right platform (please let me know any recommendations if not), but I made a display monitor in the Raspberry Pi to pull in information such as news feeds, weather, local news and sports scores. I'm trying to learn more about IoT for an assignment and would like to use my Pi project as an example.

As of now, it's just a monitor that pulls in feeds. Does this constitute an IoT device or does the information need to be relayed back somewhere?

I'm a beginner, but I was hoping someone might have some recommendations in how I could make this a true IoT device if it isn't currently. Thank you.enter image description here

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    Cross-site duplicate with raspberrypi.stackexchange.com/q/75828/19949 Please note that questions should be posted just once on the StackExchange network. – Ghanima Nov 29 '17 at 5:45
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    Welcome. I've marked your question as a duplicate of our general definition question about IoT devices; feel free to edit or ask a new question if there's something that isn't clarified there. – Aurora0001 Nov 29 '17 at 6:47
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The core idea of the Internet of Things is to have small computing devices which provide a specific, targeted interface to some thing or event or device. The small computing device collects measurements of various kinds and/or it is used to modify the state of the thing or event or device.

A specific example is an automated weather station in which a small computing device has various sensors attached and the computing device samples the sensors and collects the various measurements reported by the sensors and then provides those measurements to some other device.

Another would be an automated digital camera that is set up so that when wildlife passes by the camera takes photographs and then sends the photographs to some of device for processing or review.

What you have done is no different than what could be done and often is done with a standard workstation. It is not really an Internet of Things application as something similar is available on my Windows 10 desktop computer for instance.

I will tell you what I am doing with my Raspberry Pi.

My first application was something exactly like what you describe, PiClock is the actual application and the source code is available on the internet. It display an analogue clock along with weather forecast and driving conditions.

The next thing I did was to purchase an Osoyoo Raspberry Pi Starter Kit from Amazon. This kit contains a variety of components, sensors, a servo motor, etc. and the manufacturer has projects that start off simple on their web site. I am using this to learn the basics of electronics for IoT devices.

I have started a GitHub repository so that I can keep my notes and source code in a safe place. https://github.com/RichardChambers/raspberrypi/

Once I have gained some degree of knowledge concerning the electronics of IoT I am going to take a look at some of the projects that others have done and give one a shot.

Here is a list of resources on IoT projects for Raspberry Pi:

10 Raspberry Pi Projects For Learning IoT

hackster.io projects for Raspberry Pi

IoT Projects based on Raspberry Pi, Arduino, ESP8266, etc.

100+ Ultimate list of IoT projects for engineering students

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    Understood - thanks! Sounds like I would need to integrate some type of sensor to trigger an event. I saw Microsoft has facial recognition to turn on a monitor such as this behind a mirror in the morning. Pretty cool. Thanks! – user6142489 Nov 29 '17 at 3:11
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    @user6142489 take a look at some of the pages I have links to as well as doing a search for IoT projects. The first thing for me is to learn the electronics and to begin to know what kinds of sensors and computer controlled devices are available. My problem right now is too little knowledge to even think of an IoT project. Learning the electronics and devices should help to give me some idea as to what is possible. I first started this IoT path after tearing an automated coffee maker apart to see what was inside and to get an idea of how it works. – Richard Chambers Nov 29 '17 at 3:22

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