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I'm new to the world of IoT, I don't even have an Arduino or similar board yet... but I am very interested, especially with cryptocurrency such as IOTA making such things potentially profitable. Sadly, this also seems like a really new field too, because I have been unable to find any resource, such as a tutorial, for getting an Arduino or similar device to be able to accept IOTA as payment to access some sort of sensor on it. My questions are:

  1. Can Arduino, Raspberry Pi or some other board be programmed and has the sufficient specs to do this. If so, which?
  2. Are there any guides, tutorials, "Hello World" or other such "Get Started" guides to help implement such a thing? Anything in this sphere would probably be helpful to me as a true newb to this stuff.
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    What kind of IOTA implementation are you looking for? A wallet, a light node, a full node? – Helmar Dec 13 '17 at 8:45
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    Wikipedia topic en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IOTA_(technology) and this looks to be the developer portal dev.iota.org and this appears to be a GitHub repository for some IOTA materials github.com/iotaledger – Richard Chambers Dec 13 '17 at 12:18
  • This appears to be a GitBook on IOTA with a beginner guide gitbook.com/book/matthewwinstonjohnson/iota-guide-and-faq/… – Richard Chambers Dec 13 '17 at 12:23
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    For question "What kind of IOTA implementation are you looking for? A wallet, a light node, a full node?", the answer is it doesn't really matter. At this point I am open to any and all options... – Serj Sagan Dec 13 '17 at 15:10
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    @SerjSagan that's valuable information that you should include with edit into your question. If you don't care about it the least-resource intensive option can be considered for an answer. – Helmar Dec 18 '17 at 13:53
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To interact with IOTA, you must be running or have access to an IRI node, which usually has its API exposed. IOTA is still in a heavy development phase, and an embedded linux device such as Raspberry Pi doesn't have the resources to run an IRI node. The open source Ruuvi tag is a good example of IoT device pushing data onto the IOTA tangle. The tags are basically bluetooth enabled sensors, and will usually be tethered to a RaspPi. The Raspberry Pi then relays this data to a public IRI server.

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    At the moment, the IRI program is written in java. It is not resource friendly, but they are porting the program to C++. They will also have light wallets. These types of nodes could run on a RaspPi or OpenWrt. Microcontrollers such as Arduino would be wireless connected to the Pi, communicate via the API on the node. They are also developing a low-cost processor called JINN, a ternary processor. Have fun going down that rabbit hole – GusGorman402 Dec 18 '17 at 6:05
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    A link to where Ruuvi is "pushing data onto the IOTA tangle" would be really helpful. – Serj Sagan Dec 18 '17 at 16:48
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    Here is the main article lab.ruuvi.com/iota They wrote a NodeJS program that can run on embedded linux. github.com/ojousima/ruuvi-nodejs/blob/frankfurt-hackathon/… The embedded linux device (RaspPi) gets sensor data, via bluetooth, from the ruuvi. The RaspPi contacts a public IOTA server and gets the hashes of 2 transactions for the Proof of Work. The RaspPI does the proof of work, using the ccurl algorithm, creates the transactions object containing the sensor data, and sends the data to an IOTA address via the IOTA public server. You can host your own node too – GusGorman402 Dec 18 '17 at 23:30
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    Because there are no transaction fees on IOTA, you can make zero value transactions if you're willing to do the PoW(takes a few seconds). The transaction contains meta data fields (tag and signatureMessage) iota.readme.io/docs/the-anatomy-of-a-transaction where users (and IoT devices) can store/send small amounts of data, such as sensor data. – GusGorman402 Dec 18 '17 at 23:38
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    This site has Hello World tutorials learn.iota.org/tutorials and here is Industrial IoT example, using IOTA payments to activate servo simform.com/iota-iiot-tutorial-part-2 – GusGorman402 Dec 18 '17 at 23:42

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