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In Australia, the SmartThings hub isn't currently on the market:

Not yet released in Australia, Samsung’s SmartThings platform promises loads of great home automation.

If I have some products in mind that use ZigBee and Z-Wave and want to benefit from the features of SmartThings, can I order a SmartThings hub from another country, like the US, and then use it in Australia?

Will Australian smart devices be compatible with this imported hub, or will I need to import the devices too?

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I know this is an older thread, but thought this may be helpful.

Technically, only the Z-WAVE portion of SmartThings is illegal in Australia. The band used is unlicensed, but still managed under legislation.

The band does not interfere with any licenced bands, such as mobile or TV, but can interfere with Radar and the like and as there is no ability for the overseas hub to monitor this, it would make you liable for interference.

Zigbee and IP protocol use 2.4GHz same as WiFi so they are perfectly legal and usable in Australia.

You have two options. Both include disabling the inbuilt Z-Wave in SmartThings.

Option 1) Buy only Zigbee or IP based products.

Option 2) buy a Z-Wave USB dongle on the Australian Frequencies.

Also note that SmartThings and Samsung will not provide any technical support to Australia.

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No – it's illegal to operate a UK or US SmartThings Hub in Australia (or any US/UK Z-Wave device).

US Z-Wave devices operate at 908.42 MHz, and UK devices at 868.42 MHz. Both of these frequencies are occupied by other uses in Australia, such as mobile frequencies. It is therefore not legal to operate a SmartThings hub set to UK or US settings with a Z-Wave radio which could interfere with these frequencies.

The Australian Z-Wave frequency is 921.4 MHz, so Australian Z-Wave devices wouldn't be compatible with your new US/UK SmartThings hub, and using US/UK Z-Wave devices is not legal in Australia. Even without connecting Z-Wave devices to the hub, it may still broadcast on that frequency and therefore interfere, even if you don't plan to touch Z-Wave.

By extension, any imported Z-Wave device (hub or endpoint) not designed for the Australian market is likely to be illegal to operate and may interfere with other frequencies.

There is some relevant discussion on the SmartThings forum. Oddly enough Australian backers for the SmartThings hub did get a device that was set to Australian frequencies, but there appear to have been no further attempts to cater for the Australian market.

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