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14

The device itself isn't really particularly important here. While the boundaries between 'IoT' and just a normal network connection are a bit fuzzy around the edges, the general consensus is that the main requirement is that you're interacting with the physical environment in some way. How you reach that goal is up to you, and so it doesn't really matter if ...


11

The Google Home and Amazon Echo use microphone arrays to enhance 'far-field recognition' (i.e. recognising your voice from a reasonable distance with good accuracy). The Echo uses a 7-microphone array (image from iFixit, with the microphones in green) and the Google Home uses a 2-mic array (iFixit; in yellow). Amazon's 7-Mic Array is open for developers ...


8

Aurora0001's great answer got me doing some more research and I found some really good information on a lot of mic arrays, including benchmarks. Seeed ReSpeaker Mic Array Conexant 4-Mic Development Kit Microsemi AcuEdge MATRIX Creator MiniDSP UMA-8 PlayStation Eye (Tonor Stereo Condenser Microphone) medium.com did some awesome benchmarking on these. For ...


6

I'm not sure why you're checking for z's and so on but your first else if clause ensures that none of the clauses in the rest of the block is ever executed. else if (state != 'z' && state!=0) { digitalWrite(ledG, LOW);} // turn the LED off by making the voltage LOW When state is any value that's neither z nor 0 (x, y, etc) then this block is ...


6

Short answer is NO, IoT is really a concept about "things" communicating (usually over the internet) with other "things", by this definition a phone can just as easily be a thing as a raspberry PI, or a PC. IoT as a concept is device agnostic. From an Android Studio point of view, adding IoT support means that common protocols and support libraries ...


5

If the phone is new enough to run a version of Android with full Google Assistant then it should work for most things. The main points that differ will be: The microphone on the phone won't be nearly as good as the microphone array in the dedicated Google Home device. So voice recognition across the room will likely be not as good. You won't be able to set ...


5

How about something like Owntracks + Node-RED with the geofence node. Owntracks runs on your phone and can upload your location to either a MQTT broker or a HTTP server. Node-RED can either subscribe to the MQTT topic or provide the HTTP endpoints to accept the incoming messages. Then the geofence node can be set up to mark locations of interest which can ...


5

Probably an old Android version on the phone. You need Android version 7.0 or higher. With Philips Hue app version 3.30 or higher. 3.30 is automatically installed by Google Play depending on the Android version on the phone.


4

I had the same problem. Download the .apk from the internet and install it. https://philips-hue.apk.gold/android-6.0 That should solve your issue.


3

This is exactly what BLE beacon technology does. It requires an app* on the device to tell the phone to listen for the broadcasts and then act accordingly when it receives one. Beacons have a normal range of approximately 10m * An app is required because otherwise this would be a truly horrific way to force advertising on people. Before Google gave up on ...


3

This is tricky. It would be easiest to run the Android app and wait for the button press. You can used off the shelf hardware like this IOIO board to do this. But then you have to ask your self if I am running the Android app then why do I not just press a button on the Android? There are other ways to get an Android app's attention. But then you need ...


3

Yep, it seems straight forward. If a visual demonstration is needed, I would recommend the Unboxing and Setup by AppleLeigh. There is a trailer from "Tiler Support" here which might also be useful. The steps they follow are: Confirm your email address in the app Follow the in-app steps to "Firmly press the E on the Tile" and "Place the Tile near the ...


2

Lots of single-board computers support android in their BSP. It's often less porting effort than Ubuntu since the SoCs generally have mobile as a primary market. If you need it, this can give you more processing power than the more common Raspberry Pi 3. For example, the LeMaker HiKey which is an 8 core A53 with up to 2GB of RAM. Other options worth looking ...


2

To improve on TisteAndii's answer, your program could lose context which might be part of your problem on the serial line because it has no start/stop markers. For example, say a byte gets dropped, and then the next byte (a value byte) is a 'y' then next state would be read as a value. I would recommend framing your packets, especially with software serial. ...


2

You could hack an Amazon Dash button since they are cheap. Or use something like a raspberry Pi Zero W, which is also cheap. And both of there are much cheaper than @hardillb's suggestion of Flic.io, where prices start at $34.99 for a single button. If you don't like those for some reason, take a look at AdaFruit. They have some interesting wearables, ...


2

To my knowledge, this is unfortunately not possible. The BatteryPercentage ingredient comes from the Android Battery trigger, so you can only get that data if you are using one of the Android Battery triggers (i.e. charging, removed from charger or < 15% charge). Since there's no way of chaining things effectively on IFTTT, it's simply not possible to get ...


2

I have found the answer to this and it can be achieved by creating a .pem file which includes the client.crt and client.key. Then we can create a .bks using portecle which should contain client.pem, ca.crt and server.crt and then we create a socketfactory with the bks and add that socketfactory to client.


2

Use pushbullet it is a great app which let's you send data from your raspberry pi to your other devices. Also you can send messages to your raspberry pi as well from your mobile phone. it is available on both ios & android. You can encrypt your data as well. During trial service rate limitation will be there if you buy the pro version then there are no ...


2

You can create multi speaker groups with Google Assistant devices (Google Home, Google Nest mini, Google Nest Hub...) and you can "cast" the audio to these groups directly from your phone. The app you use to play the audio needs to support casting, but nearly all do since the actual support is provided by the Google Play Services library and it's just a ...


2

First of all, Welcome to IoT Stack Exchange! Now answering your question... I really think you should make your own. All you would need is an NRF51/2, a cheap vibration motor (those are usually rated 3V/70mA), a transistor and some good ol' coding. I researched a little bit about bracelets with vibration that can also be controlled with 3rd party apps ...


1

I'll answer myself. Home Assistant is just enough to implement almost anything I've wanted. I've tried OpenHAB and it was waaaay too long until I was able to automate anything. Also I got really confused with it's Dashboards, doesn't look like an easy to enter solution. On the other hand, I gave a shot to Home Assistant and within just a weekend I've ...


1

For the app side, You could also use something like Tasker, it will need to be triggered by something, from what I understand you may need to add the MQTT plugin / broker to it.


1

Are single boards always necessary when implementing an IoT connection? No, Single Board Computers aren't necessary. Single Board Computers provide a very effective way to build a proof of concept, and are instrumental when the developers are trying to create the software stack. But, for a mass scale production a specific design is created. A specific ...


1

According to support on thetileapp.com, it's fairly simple: Adding a Tile to your app is easy! Just follow these quick instructions for each new Tile that you would like to use: Add a Tile: Tap the + button to add a Tile. Press the "Tile" button or "e" button firmly on the Tile until you hear it play a tune. Place the Tile on your ...


1

Pushbullet has a Tasker plugin embedded with the android application which allows to filter incoming messages and (regex) parse text within. A program can for example push a pushbullet via pushbullet's api on the phone a tasker profile can intercept the incoming message and regex match the message with a known patern (I'm on vacation, Intrusion,...) and ...


1

You could potentially install Android 7 on a Raspberry Pi 3 if you wanted to run that, as described by the MagPi magazine. The binaries can be downloaded here, although I can't tell if the performance will be that great, or if it will be sufficient to run an AR application. You might just be able to use a USB camera (according to this discussion) although ...


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