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5

Yes, the whole point of using client side certificates is to enable you to reliably uniquely identify each client. AWS will provide APIs to provision each device with it's own cert/key. The other reason is that it means that you can easily ban a single device if the certificate is compromised, if every device reuses the same certificate then you have to ...


3

Do you know if the nodes being provisioned have proper date/time set? In my experience with similar situation, it turned out that NTP is often blockedby ISPs and IoT nodes could not fetch network time. It is necessary for the certificate expiration verifications.


2

It depends on the type of data and what you want to do with it. I have a Raspberry Pi AWS IoT project and I'm storing data on DynamoDB. But since I need to do aggregation queries, I then feed it from there to ElasticSearch. You are more than likely going to need to use a Lambda triggered by IoT to move information around on AWS. To view the data and ...


2

I would look at Node Red for an IoT dashboard. (Indeed, http://remuda.omnipresense.com/ui is my dashboard for speeds on my street, and done using Node Red on a Raspberry Pi) The almost-built-in Dashboard module is pretty powerful for making interfaces. The dashboard widgets are zero-code drag-and-drop widgets that typically look great. The complexity you ...


2

Below is what I would do if I were you. I would completely skip the Pi (unnecessary design complications and need for additional hardware + code) and ensure the nodes send data directly to the AWS over wifi(for indoors) using MQTT. For ensuring a longer battery life, I would to the following: Ensure the nodes are in deep-sleep most of the times and wake up ...


2

You got the right idea, let's jump into your questions: First of all, you need to think about the microcontroller itself. Since you said that you need wifi/bluetooth, I could recommend an ESP8266 (wifi only) or an ESP32 (wifi and bluetooth, also more expensive). Now for the battery: there are some dev boards which already include all of the battery ...


2

There may be paths with a MTU of 1280 in the way. Try 1100 or 1200 and see if that fixes it. If not, try to find an MTU finder app to try to find the MTU to your destination from your source.


2

Based on what we've seen in the comments and edits, I think it might be worth setting a lower MTU for the cellular link. Try running something like the following: nmcli con mod "user_apn" gsm.mtu 1300 This should cause the MQTT client (in combination with the network stack) to break packets up into smaller chunks which hopefully should be able to ...


1

Provision an IoT thing. For your purpose, you can just do a one off. In your case, use the client id for your dad's device in the SQL where clause of the IoT rule. https://docs.aws.amazon.com/iot/latest/developerguide/iot-sql-functions.html#iot-sql-function-clientid Another idea is to change the topic that is published. Perhaps temperature/dadsRoom and use ...


1

Check out our https://mqttlab.iotsim.io/aws for Getting Started with AWS IoT.


1

Assuming you have an app to push the WiFi credentials to the device, can you test the MQTT connection from the app over the same network? This would give you access to the errors thrown by the MQTT stack as it tries to connect. Alternatively can the device log errors that could be collected by the app via Bluetooth in the case of a failure. Or since HTTP (...


1

In this case, since its a software, why not just allow it to have a UI, where you can ask for a userID, password and make an API call where you can then provision a device and get an IoT certificate ? If for some reason, this has to be a headless device, you have two things to do: You need a unique ID. This can just be a guid. Or you can call an API to get ...


1

You shouldn't use the same client id for both mosquitto apps. Client id's need to be unique, so you'll have to add a new one to the policy.


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