Hot answers tagged

14

The model that IoT Hub connected devices use is that they will never accept incoming connections. IoT Hub devices never act as a 'server', and this is a crucial part of the security model in Azure IoT. The definitive model on this is encapsulated in Clemens Vasters' 'Service Assisted Communication'. Therefore devices are always 'polling' an external service ...


5

I don't think there are many off-the-shelf configurable end products (maybe a Kickstarter idea). The only one I found so far was Hexiware and I have no idea how complete that is. Cost wise, I think you have about the right target in mind. You absolutely want hardware which has some good eccosystem support rather than being too reliant on a custom stack from ...


5

Tor seems overkill for what you're trying to do. If you want to prevent sniffing of data on the network, simply communicate with the server using SSL by installing a certificate on the server. You may also want to pay more attention to firewall rules to block incoming traffic using netsh advfirewall firewall The pi is not very secure if anyone can get ...


4

If you want an off-the-shelf solution, you might want to consider the D-Link Wi-Fi Siren. It is currently available for $49.99, and has six different siren sounds. It connects directly to a Wi-Fi router. Currently, the only way to connect to it from an external service (that I could find) is via IFTTT. You could set up a recipe that would: receive a call ...


4

The device you can use is: Raspberry Pi, it will cost you around $30 like you want for your budget. The best thing with Raspberry Pi is you can install Ubuntu / Debian flavours of Linux on it and then install a LAMP stack on it. Using PHP / Python as the Language you can communicate to the device Using REST API's and can achieve the effect you want. For ...


4

I haven't worked with Azure as such but Message Broker for AWS IoT uses MQTT and is like any other MQTT broker (like mosquitto for Linux). MQTT messages basically work on Topics. If the android app is subscribing to a topic then it can receive messages for that topic. Suppose if you have two IoT devices sending data op topics "Topic/Dev1" and "Topic/Dev2" ...


4

We haven't been contacted by anyone who is using their own protocol client to connect to an Azure IoT Edge device working as a transparent gateway. That said, we do have many customers successfully using their own protocol client to connect to Azure IoT Hub. For these devices, connecting to an Edge device instead of IoT Hub should just require the ...


4

I found my issue and how to fix it. Posting as an answer here for completeness in case others have similar issues. Azure virtual machines (Resource Manager, not classic) can be created with a public ip address. This is where the idle timeout is managed. It is defaulted to 4 minutes. If you click on the ip address in the portal, you'll be taken to the ...


3

Just to complete this question. As worked out in the comments. It looks like Azure's router drops connections that have been idle for 5 mins. See this Stack Overflow answer for details: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/16840834/are-established-network-connections-to-azure-endpoint-terminated-by-firewall-or


2

I would look at Node Red for an IoT dashboard. (Indeed, http://remuda.omnipresense.com/ui is my dashboard for speeds on my street, and done using Node Red on a Raspberry Pi) The almost-built-in Dashboard module is pretty powerful for making interfaces. The dashboard widgets are zero-code drag-and-drop widgets that typically look great. The complexity you ...


1

A digital twin is just a (virtual) object that entirely reflects the state of the physical device. This means that any time the device changes state it needs to report this back to the "cloud". If the change is triggered from the cloud this is not a problem because the digital twin can be updated as the request is acknowledged. But if the device has say a ...


1

The answer is more or less same if you have seen this question Should there be one device provisioning service for one IoT hub if it is associated with one tenant? Yes DPS isolates tenant configuration based on attestation mechanism. Let's say, if X509 certificate based attestation mechanism is used and there are 5 tenants. There will be single root CA for ...


1

It seems a single Device Provsioning Service (DPS) instance is enough to handle this scenario. All I have to consider is the attestation mechanism, in order to identify the devices to DPS. An intermediate certificate of the tenant can be uploaded in the DPS enrollment list and the same certificate will be used for signing the device certificates which belong ...


1

I have been building IoT solutions on Azure since before IoT hub and have done it in various different ways over the last few years. So this comes from experience of doing it different ways and learning from mistakes. You don't say how many devices/messages there are per tenant, but I'll assume that it is more than hundreds of devices. My recommendation is ...


1

To get a complete multi-tenancy you will have to create a specific IoT Hub instance per customer which will give you a full separation between tenants. The downsides of this approach are: Pricing - the smallest instance of IoT Hub can consume 400K of messages per a day, so you will pay for this overhead if you have small tenants that sends less messages. ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible