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27

Blockchain, Gada explains, is “a suitable solution in at least three aspects of IoT, including big data management, security and transparency, as well as facilitation of micro-transactions based on the exchange of services between interconnected smart devices.” Big data management: I couldn't disagree more. Blockchains are inherently inefficient at ...


23

Blockchains have applications on IoT devices, but there's nothing about IoT which makes blockchains more or less applicable. The specific threats mentioned in the article are: Malware. Blockchain does nothing to prevent this. The router/camera/DVR vulnerabilities were mostly due to poor design. Firmware verification (when implemented, which is rare) is ...


10

Blockchain technology provides a distributed transaction record. New data is appended to the chain and encrypted by multiple parties. The encryption process is compute intensive which makes it relatively hard for the data to be either corrupted or retrospectively modified. The most well known application of the blockchain is in enabling financial ...


7

How, exactly, would a blockchain system provide such protection to a network of connected devices? Below is a quick breakdown with a source explaining with an example in more detail but essentially it makes it so there are multiple approvers that approve a transaction, some level of access, etc. so if something slips through the cracks of one, it still has ...


6

It doesn't appear to be open source, but IBM offers Watson IoT with Blockchain as a platform for secure private blockchains for IoT services: IBM Watson IoT Platform enables IoT devices to send data to private blockchain ledgers for inclusion in shared transactions with tamper-resistant records. Blockchain’s distributed replication allows your business ...


6

Quantum mechanics and the blockchain Those are two evergreens in every futuristic buzzword bingo. Thus, naturally they get mixed with the Internet of Things, which has been derisively put in the same category of futuristic stuff people half get. So, let's sort the stuff out a bit. I'm assuming that you're referring to this article Aurora dug up. ...


5

The fundamental purpose of blockchain is not building a distributed ledger or a distributed database. The basic thing that people find hard to understand is that blockchain is not an ultimate architecture that solves every problem of their. But, It's just a tool that offers some features. Use it, only if it suits you. Definitely not good for Big data ...


3

I faced interesting discussion started by Theo Priestley at LinkedIn about IoT and blockchain stating: IoT cannot -- authenticate millions/billions of service nodes (sensors, devices, etc.), -- secure data between sensors and the database, -- provide firmware & operating system protection, -- manage IoT nodes without servers, nor -- manage provisioning ...


3

Yes. IoT devices (e.g. wifi thermostat) with no open/listening ports, such as telnet or http, usually dial into a central server, and stay connected to that server 24/7. When you are abroad, the thermostat app on your smartphone contacts the same CENTRALIZED server when you want to change the temperature, and that server relays the command back to the ...


1

If the overall cyber security as well malware breach points you're all referring too, requires that of simple IP to IP connections, or LAN spreads, of ports which are not necessarily open at all times, but once either an active session on the server side either opens an/ the range of ports (that of a service, remote connection, etc) a user(s) could commit ...


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