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UL (formerly Underwriters Laboratories) provide the Cybersecurity Assurance Program to certify that an Internet of Things device is, in their opinion, secure from most major threats. UL seem to be highly respected in their certification processes, according to Ars Technica: UL, the 122-year-old safety standards organisation whose various marks (UL, ENEC, ...


5

All certified Z-Wave products conform to their communication protocol. And that's what ensures interoperability. In particular, a certified product must register with a Z-Wave network controller. The latter gives out a 4 byte network / home ID to the former and also assigns to it a 1 byte node ID. The node ID ensures that each product registered to a ...


5

If I understand the question correctly, you're proposing to ignore the legal requirements to avoid interfering with other radio users? Generally this is not enforced by the telecoms operator, it's enforced by the FCC, Ofcom or an equivalent. They may be able to compel the telecoms operator to identify you, and you potentially face criminal sanction, not just ...


3

I want to add to Aurora0001's answer that we can only protect against known threats. Recently, we've seen the Spectre and Meltdown attacks against hardware. Whilst Intel CPU's are not commonly used in IoT devices, we will probably find security problems with IoT hardware in the future. Previously we've seen Rowhammer and Heartbleed, as general system-class ...


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