8

N.B.: Including this answer here in hopes that it helps someone else. Yes, it's actually quite simple. The issue is not so much with the operating system as it is that mydlink.com has not officially supported the Ubuntu operating system. Therefore, all that is necessary is to fake your user agent. There are several options on how to do this: 1. Directly ...


7

Anything that involves a direction is going to require at least two sensors. I implemented something like this a while ago but we had the advantage of UHF RFID cards. We had employees with the RFID cards on them and a "choke point" - i.e. a hallway with a sensor at both ends. We could then see direction of people based on the timestamp difference of each ...


7

Generally speaking you have to adjust the trigger for the motion detection. There's the sensitivity for the actual motion detection and that is as bravokeyl already says despite all technology most efficiently done by trial and error. That might not work the same for all times of day due to low sun, clouds and other factors changing the lighting. Also cats. ...


6

It may be useful for you to consult Bence Kaulics' guide to selecting a microcontroller, which takes into account many constraints such as processing power, energy usage and developer tools. It's a good read with a lot of valuable information on the selection process. However, I don't think you're really looking for a microcontroller; a single-board ...


6

Have to start out by saying, this will have to take place on the router. I looked into the camera, but it simply seems to be too manufacturer set to be able to run a crack that complex on. Perhaps if you did some firmware replacement you could manage, but not simply. With your particular router, it appears that you can. I don't actually have your router, ...


6

You should go with updated firmware, yes. In most cases this is a good idea when you have known vulnerabilities and old firmware (remember there will be more vulnerabilities you don't know about!). Even if they weren't working on those specific vulnerability fixes, different firmware may have removed some of them anyway, and discovery of new vulnerabilities ...


5

A better approach is to get a broadband router that will fall back to using a 3G/4G USB stick if the broadband line goes down. This means any devices (such as your Nest cam) doesn't need to know about 2 different networks, the router handles all that for all devices. There are plenty of these on the market as it's a standard fall back for small businesses ...


5

I am looking for the same thing and found your request here in my Google search. There are a ton of opensource cameras out there. Something high end (3D stereo vision for starters): https://www.elphel.com/ open hardware and free software. I am not associated with this company, they happen to be local and I've known the founder for years.


5

If, on the other hand, we look the user guide, we will see that WiFi is providing a 100% cordless connection from the camera to the base station and Ethernet is the way for connecting the whole system to the Internet. The thought of connecting WiFi for Internet is not correct according to that document. Also connecting wire to Ethernet in previous step does ...


5

As detailed in my answer to the precision question (https://iot.stackexchange.com/a/341/78) the current generation of sdcards doesn't seem to support inherent geo-location capabilities anymore. Furthermore, Eye-Fi was bought by Ricoh. Looking at their product portfolio they seem to prefer to include the GPS function in the camera right away or offer ...


5

My DLink camera also warns me about luminosity changes (clouds,...) but no too often. Take a look at your camera settings to search for a "threshold" value and reduce it. Another quite heavy solution should be to upload pictures to a local FTP (or something else) server, watch for file modifications and send them less often via a program which handles a ...


4

Based on the information in the product datasheet, this device communicates wirelessly via 802.11n-compliant protocols over a 2.4GHz channel.


4

Both protocols are usually transmitted using RS485 over a pair of wires. You can have the same pair of wires running to multiple cameras with each camera having a different address. The maximum length for RS485 is about 1200m which makes it ideal for running between the cameras. There are various pieces of equipment you can use to combine the RS485 and the ...


4

I'd do something like this (untested): # loop frames of video/stream and count them counter = 0 while cap.isOpened(): # Stripped for brevity #if first frame is None or too old, initialize it if firstframe is None or counter > 3000: firstframe = gray counter = 0 continue # Stripped for brevity ...


4

It is said in netgear pages that: After you integrate your Arlo cameras into the SmartThings app, you must use the SmartThings app to configure your modes and rules. If you edit your modes and rules in the Arlo app, you disarm the SmartThings mode. So, custom Modes and all logics should be on Smartthings side.


3

This sort of product may not be popular because it doesn't offer the consumer level features that permit the manufacturer to charge a premium. If it doesn't appeal to the tech press (i.e. conform mostly to existing convention) then it won't sell, certainly not at a good price. Remote operation would come high up on the 'necessary feature' list, and that ...


3

This ended up working for me: Create a new mode in Arlo app. Have it do any recording or notifications Connect Arlo to SmartThings (using Arlo Connect SmartApp) Add each Arlo device as needed Select each newly added Arlo device and set it to Inactive (click the green camera icon from status screen of Thing) As needed, update Smart Home Monitor routines (ie ...


3

Pelco P is the older of the two protocols and is deprecated; Pelco D is newer and has more functionality. Both protocols use RS-422 at 2400, 4800, or 9600 bps, but support for the various speeds is hardware-dependent. Some cameras such as Spectra IV domes auto-sense the protocol and switch between P and D automatically, while others require that P or D be ...


3

You can use infrared sensors. Put a sensor near both the in and out location—one each. Now have an Arduino board for interrupt. Whenever people enter or exit, the infrared rays will be broken and you will get an interrupt. Keep a separate count for both in and out. With this, you can calculate how many people have been inside or outside. This is for hobby ...


3

An image based product is probably simpler as a stand-alone device (i.e. not integrated with an access control system). Image processing is now reaching the point where this should be something that can be implemented with a reasonably powerful SBC and a camera - so I expect a Raspberry Pi-3 plus camera might be the right point to start looking. It sounds ...


3

I don't get what you mean by presence, but you can get notifications of door bell button push and / or when motion detection gets triggered. I understood from the specifications that with SmartThings you can switch either one of them on or off and also drive another SmartThings device like a light switch based on the notification. There's more information ...


3

I have been looking at the CHIP Pro, this board seems to almost nail it except the problem that there are no camera drivers for the onboard camera connectors. A USB camera could work, but its not really neat to generate a production version with an usb powered camera I think? One could hot glue the board with the USB connector together but still I think ...


3

I don't have the setup in question with me but I try to answer in general. Normally any sensor that detects changes in motion depends on the configuration that we set for sensitivity, threshold. I presume the camera in the question might have an option to set the sensivity threshold, exactly how much threshold to put is uncertain to say. In my opinion, the ...


2

Are you really only asking which will draws more current? In either case, the cost will be negligible. I would have made this a comment, but it grew too long. What, exactly, are your requirements for a webcam? It is just for Skype & the like, or for security? Must it ...


2

The I found quite quick and usefull- was like that: Connect IPCAM directly to PC's LAN port Change Adapter settings ( via Control Panel ) to 192.168.1.X logoff Connect using web page with default ip 192.168.1.10 and change to desired IP. ** this youtube tutorial helped a lot !


2

The presence of a commercial product which has reviews of varying quality should be a good sign that building something like this from scratch is a non-trivial undertaking. Doing IoT well is hard. Doing it yourself brings some advantages - you can tune the installation for a specific location, implement your own configuration strategy (most likely cli based)...


1

It can be done with openWRT with some models, though is not offically supported and not fully functional, example: https://blog.tho.ms/hacks/2016/08/28/openwrt-on-logilink-wc0030a.html That camera uses a popular soic used in many similar models


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