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9

Update May 2019. Stringify is shutting down. I've only just discovered this platform, but https://www.stringify.com/ appears to support both logic processing, and sequential actions in it's flows. It can interact with IFTTT.


9

In fact you are searching for a IFTTT equivalent with internal variables and eventually fork actions to store a counter for example... Tasker handles all that but runs only on phones and has only phone events (it can do http call though) Netvibes manages multiple triggers and actions, but if you want vars you must perform a GET/POST with information through ...


6

Only if you put the Dots in separate accounts. The problem with IFTTT is that you can only connect to the Alexa services once. Vice versa the Alexa App doesn't allow differentiating between several Echo Dots for specific Skills. (Just try it, there are literally no settings on either side to help you out.) To achieve a recipe that's only active on one ...


6

Zapier is another tool you can use if you are not aware: Zapier moves info between your web apps automatically, so you can focus on your most important work. There is a list of integrations here—most are related to web applications rather than IoT devices, although you can integrate with AWS Lambda (or similar services) which might be useful in an IoT ...


5

You did specify that ideally you didn't want a hub, but I think you'll either have to compromise on that if you want IFTTT to be able to integrate with the sensor. If you're open to a Z-Wave sensor, the Everspring ST815 seems relatively suitable: The Z-Wave Wireless Illumination Sensor with LCD Screen from Everspring activates programs or devices ...


5

Cloud-based services are unlikely to offer much 'local-lan' functionality without some competitive pressure. Specifically, a lan implementation requires a local hub. That could be the service's native hub, or it could (in your case) be a 3rd party hub. Generally, LAN functionality seems to be supported only where there is a WAN fallback (to hide the local ...


3

I believe that stringify can do this, and will also interact with IFTTT if you need to access specific devices. I thought that IFTTT also had a new feature to write applets (with cloud state), but I'm unable to locate that in their documentation right now.


3

You could use the competitor Stringify which supports subsequent actions as well as conditions in their rule engine. This rule for example does three actions: WHEN I say "OK Google, tell Stringify Good Night"... THEN turn on my Hue Bulb A19 to orange at 15% brightness, AND set the cool temperature on my Nest Thermostat to 69F... THEN fade off ...


3

It turns out that I forgot the basic step of actually connecting the device to IFTTT via the "external service" menu in the smartphone app. What I did was open the app on the phone, click "settings", then "external services", then "Easycontrol pairing page". That will require the serial number, access code and password....


3

As far as I understand, having Alexa say something is not a "that"-action that is available on IFTTT. Therefore, you need to have another approach. One possible way would be to use Node-red running on e.g. a Raspberry Pi, where you could use the email node to check periodically for new mails in your account. Once you have the trigger for the arrival of ...


3

If you want to send a "then that" trigger to your esp8266, you can use a webhook. However, you need to do some preparations on your home network: You need to have a webserver running on your esp8266. You need to enable port forwarding on your router for one port to be forwarded to your esp8266. You need to know your public facing IP-address or you need to ...


3

The Date & Time service allows you to trigger events at specific times, down to 15 minute granularity. So you could have one event to switch it on, and one to fade out 15 minutes later. If you need it faster than that, you can trigger events using Google Calender. If you set up a custom calendar for IFTTT events, and use "Event from search starts", you ...


3

You can do a bit of a gnarly workaround if you have a Google Calendar account. Create a new Calendar (e.g. "IFTTT Blink") Create weekly repeating events for Tuesdays and Thursdays in that calendar In IFTTT, use the "Any Event Starts" trigger for Google Calendar, and choose your IFTTT Blink calendar In my experience the events trigger dead on time, but of ...


3

IFTTT have now launched a maker platform which appears to support filters and chaining. I've not yet worked out if it has timers and cloud side variables/storage.


3

The linked article is a little misleading. The interface provided by IFTTT is not completely open, it requires a key in the request. Since the request is made using HTTPS, the secret is not directly observable (provided your client always reliably connects to IFTTT, not a mitm proxy). From the maker channel information page (user specific) To trigger an ...


3

The best I've found, that checks all of the boxes listed in the question is... A personal weather station such as this one would do the job. It appears that some of these would give you an output of watts / m^2 which could then be used to decide if you wanted lights on or off (or even an inversely proportional dimmer setting)


3

My team have been developed sensor for ambient light level sensor working on smart building lighting project. Sensor is based on of-the-shelf sensor (Texas Instruments OPT3001) adjusted for our proprietary protocol (xFSB). Mentioned sensor was chosen between 3 other sensors - so according to ours tests this one has really good performances. We used values ...


3

15 minutes after ringing my Ring doorbell (notifications from the Ring app come literally instantly) my lights (also instant from the app) blink. 20 seconds after pressing a Amazon AWS Dash button, the function is executed. Point is: The delay can be anywhere from 5 seconds, to 50 minutes. Do not rely on IFTTT.


2

No, it doesn't at the moment. The only this block that supports custom entries is the trigger block you cited yourself already. That function block does not support any special characters to be entered that would be necessary to define IFTTT variables. So yes, you do have to create a recipe manually for every phrase Alexa is supposed to react to via IFTTT. ...


2

Well, it can be done by switching to Alexa ;-) I'm in a similar fix: I have a weather station that can report current conditions with a JSON message in response to an HTTP request. I was able to write an Alexa skill that could fetch the message and compose a spoken response. I picked up a Home Mini during the Christmas sale because I've read it does ...


2

Google Assistant recently added the ability to execute multiple commands in a shortcut, which solves this problem for me. I was able change my "tea time" shortcut to look like: "Set a 4 minute timer called tea and turn on the 4 minute timer light."


2

You can use simple camera (e.g CCTV) to capture image and process this image to get light info. Without any sensor. Calculate the sum of R+G+B for all pixels divided by 3 then by the total number of pixels S=0; For (i = 0 to n-1){ S=S + Ri+Gi+Bi } Level = S/(3*n) This will give a level value between 0 (dark) and 255 (bright) A similar Javascript ...


2

To my knowledge, this is unfortunately not possible. The BatteryPercentage ingredient comes from the Android Battery trigger, so you can only get that data if you are using one of the Android Battery triggers (i.e. charging, removed from charger or < 15% charge). Since there's no way of chaining things effectively on IFTTT, it's simply not possible to get ...


1

It was intentionally omitted for security reason, you do not want anyone (hacker or intruder when integrated with other smart home like Alexa and others) to open the door.


1

All you need is 2 Resistors and then any microcontroller with a 3.3v GPIO input pin (e.g. ESP8266) You need to build a voltage divider, the equations on that page will help you work out what the ratio of the 2 resistor values needs to be (But something like 20 kohm and 7.5 kohm should be in the right ball park). You can also use this calculator to do the ...


1

You could setup a home automation server such as: Home Assistant OpenHAB Both of these should be able to do it, I haven't got any Phillips hue sensors so I can't help too much however there is a good post here Hope that helps


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