19

There are two reasons. (1) First is simpler, end-to-end connectivity. If both source and destination have public IPv4 (or IPv6, of course) address, they can connect to each other in any direction anytime. Your IoT with private IP 192.168.0.52 however can use NAT ONLY to connect to any public IP on the Internet whenever it wants, but the rest of the ...


14

IPv6 is a necessity now; we're nearly out of IPv4 addresses already. As more and more people come online, we're starting to reach the point where IPs have to be shared across multiple people, not just one household (carrier-grade NAT), which is unacceptable, and not just a problem for IoT. IPv6 allows us to move to a more semantic representation where one ...


4

I have an idea how to solve your problem. You could periodically check external IP and mail it to yourself when it changes from ESP8266, so you will have a fresh info every time. You can also extend your app which you use to control devices, so it checks the email and when it detects one with a specific subject like "NEW IP ADDR ASSIGNED" it can parse the ...


4

As already answered in this question, almost every dynamic dns provider uses their own protocol. The protocols are often HTTP-based. The NodeMCU needs to periodically check its public IP address and send a request like this to update the ip address (for no-ip) http://username:password@dynupdate.no-ip.com/nic/update?hostname=mytest.testdomain.com&myip=...


3

I feel your approach is flawed by your 5th point: "I need to keep the per-device cost low, so cannot put Ethernet on each device." Look at it versus "I'll reinvent a layer 1 protocol and all the needed hardware to handle it" and think if it really lower your overall cost. BTW the main problem on a network is the collisions of informations from multiples ...


2

The I found quite quick and usefull- was like that: Connect IPCAM directly to PC's LAN port Change Adapter settings ( via Control Panel ) to 192.168.1.X logoff Connect using web page with default ip 192.168.1.10 and change to desired IP. ** this youtube tutorial helped a lot !


2

Your thing probably doesn't have a unique IP address in this context, unless it uses IPv6. It will have an address in a private space, such as 10.0.0.0 – 10.255.255.255 or 192.168.0.0 – 192.168.255.255, this will be behind a NAT gateway (which has the ISP assigned public address). Your thing can probably initiate outbound connections to a server (which can ...


2

There are many forms of (distributed) denial of service attacks. If some are based just on bandwidth, many will impact the service way before any link is saturated. If any request sent to your server(s) takes 100 ms of CPU time to execute, for instance, each CPU/core will at most be able to process 10 such requests per second. Even if you have 10 servers ...


1

Typically how the security camera setups work is, each vendor has their own app or web site where you can access your video stream. So once you have access to this app or website, you can share the credentials with any one and they can view the stream on the same app or website on they devices. So all you need is the authentication credentials to get access ...


1

The given settings in /etc/config/network are correct. However, to apply the settings, it isn't sufficient to restart the network via /etc/init.d/network restart but also applying the DNS servers via /etc/init.d/dnsmasq restart which had not been done. After that, the Onion Omega2 is able to connect to the internet via its ethernet connection.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible