12

In general Bluetooth equipment always comes with a proprietary app for your phone... I think that if you want to have the control over your Bluetooth switches, you might want to take a look at Arduino Bluetooth modules and command relays on it to toggle normal lamps.


11

The bulbs themselves do not generate data. You might see data being generated by a building management system, where sensors are used to determine where and how to light the rooms. It's conceivable that a smart-home lighting system can generate analytics based on user requests for lighting, but there is nothing obviously interesting about this data (even ...


10

Belkin WeMo devices use uPnP and SOAP messages for control so can be easily controlled from any number of languages and options. Some details on the work I've done working out the protocol can be found here There are also the Sonoff devices that can be flashed with firmware to allow them to be controlled using MQTT IKEA's new TRÅDFRI light system use CoAP (...


9

Your most future proof solutions will be those which fully separate the hardware from the protocol. Your example HS200 light switch joins many smart outlets in being based on an Embedded Linux system (the source is available in TP Link's GPL Code Center) Chances are, like most of the outlets, the underlying system is one derived from a strange vendor ...


7

The Hue lights automatically turn on following a power outage, this is regarded as a safety feature. Your routine ought to be stored and should resume at the next switching point.


6

To control fluorescent lights, you should look for a device called an "appliance switch". This will control any load by switching the power on or off; it does not "dim" the load. With it, your fluorescent lights will work just like your ordinary switch does today. Be aware that home automation systems generally do not consider appliance switches to be in ...


6

The closest to an answer that I can come to is this list of products supported by openhab. It doesn't identify which products use Bluetooth LE, but does identify products (indirectly) where the protocol is known.


5

You've explicitly rejected the factory recommended way to configure the circuit, which is to have only one switch controlling the load, and using remote-only signalling switches for the others. And you're doing this on the supposition that someday one of the switches will fail; but you've only said that it would leave a switch "useless", without saying why ...


5

A Z-wave scene-capable switch can be operated directly with a Z-wave remote (like the $19 Aeon Labs DSA03202 Minimote). No hub is needed for a simple setup, but you will have to have to go through a "network inclusion" step to get the switch to recognize the remote. The advantage of using devices that communicate via a broadly accepted protocol (like Z-...


5

The first issue with your proposed setup is that your Mac can't communicate with any HomeKit devices. It's unclear why this is the case, and you would have thought that one Apple platform should be able to talk to the other. But, unfortunately, they can't. Luckily, the Trådfri hub does support remote control from your Mac (or any device, really). You can ...


5

As per OSRAM Lightify Public API In order to call the API endpoints you will need a set of valid client_id and secret_id. North America (NA) developers go to https://na-developers.lightify-api.com Europe, Middle East and Africa (EMEA) developers go to https://emea-developers.lightify-api.com You will need a Lightify account in the region (NA or EMEA) to ...


5

If the appliance itself is switched, this will not be possible. If it is a remote operated switch (generic mains switch), you can try to wire it like a cross circuit, with your remote control switch and the mechanical wall mounted switch each controlling one wire ('to' and 'from', naively speaking). Note that some appliances do not fully shut down if just ...


5

There are a couple of popular options for 'smart lighting': Smart bulbs, like the Philips Hue, where the electronics are embedded in the bulb itself. Smart bulbs often have various features like multiple colours, built-in dimming (even without the wall switch necessarily being a dimmer). Smart switches, where the switch itself contains the electronics, and ...


4

Most Smart lighting systems require that there is power to the bulb at all time. This means that if you turn off the wall switch then they will no longer work. Companies like Philips with their Hue and Ikea with their Tradfi products have produced light switch like control devices which can be stuck to the wall next to the existing switches (not totally ...


4

Something like the Sonoff Basic WiFi Wireless Switch from Sonoff, of the order of $5 and has Alexa/Google Home support already should fit your requirements. It is a Wi-Fi switch that is connected to your home network, and can be operated through the Google Assistant as described here by connecting the devices to the 'eWeLink' app, and then adding smart home ...


4

Yes thats a viable solution. It vary between the different Sonoff devices. Note! Beware, working with mains voltage is lethal!


4

There are sooooo many ways to do what you ask for. There are proprietary solutions with API's and there are Open solutions with total openness. Your question is broad and hard to give a straight answer depending on what your criteria is like: the size of your wallet, technical spec, availability in your market your preferences on color and so on. If you ...


4

I've been buying Sonoff smart plugs on eBay lately and flashed them with custom firmware. This is possible because they are based on the ESP8266. They are very affordable and pretty advanced. They need to be opened and a pin header soldered onto the PCB, then you have to program them with a FTDI adapter, which you can also get cheap on eBay. It's pretty ...


4

As Chris said, the key is to separate the protocol from the hardware. But that doesn't mean you have to implement your own firmware! You can choose a switch that supports a common and readily available home automation protocol, such as Z-Wave or Insteon. These are closed protocols, but there is a wide variety of manufacturers that create interoperable ...


4

Yes, there already are such devices. If you are not bound to the rotary dial there are dimmers out there (e.g. Insteon 2477d). Probably there some rotary versions too. The Insteon variant can be controlled via their powerline messages (Spec) or via a hub. According to the Insteon website you could build your own powerline client, hook it up to a Pi, a ...


4

Smart thing here is not swithing lights on or off nor trying to 'communicate' with the turtles in a smart way. The articles you linked reveal that the point is to hide the human generated light from them. The most Smart thing is to select light colors that are visible to human but at least less visible to a turtle. People can have lights on while turtles ...


4

If you want to go the DIY route then using sonoff relays with the MQTT firmware update then it would be pretty easy to make a esp8266 based wall switch that published on/off messages to control the relay directly or via something like Node-RED or OpenHab. If you want an off the shelf product then most of the vendors for lighting normally skip the relay ...


3

As far as I can tell, there's no IoT-related 'smartness' despite the name. As mico points out, the lights work by producing frequencies of light that humans can see, but that will not affect the turtle breeding cycle. On their website, they promote the energy saving benefits, but don't mention any networking features, as you'd expect from a 'smart bulb' ...


3

In-line dimmers have to be dimmers rather than switches because they have no neutral return at the switch. This makes any multi-way arrangement nigh impossible. The 'obvious' homebrew solution is a z-wave relay, and a unit to aggregate 'switch' requests into a control toggle. Probably requires an mcu or SBC to facilitate this, and this would extend to more ...


3

I created a project a while ago that some kids could/did put together. If there is Wi-Fi access, have a look at my project: http://davidtaylorgineer.blogspot.co.za/2017/07/wi-fi-enabled-bed-lamp-project-to-teach.html (Source code available) ESP8266 with an appropriate relay would work. Probably cheaper than the same 433MHz remote without any range issues. ;-...


3

If you're looking to keep clutter off of your wifi network, you could use Z-Wave or Zigbee lights (bulbs, sockets, or switches). Each of those network protocols can be run using a USB controller that would plug into your Linux machine. Both standards have active open-source communities. As MatsK said, it is pretty easy to integrate those into power scripts ...


3

in the ceilling you need a relay with a controlling board of somekind. For the "remote" switches one microcontroller reading a momentary or latching switch. the remote MCU sends a message (MQTT for example) to the relay MCU that activates or deactivates the load. This is just one simple way to do it. FR


3

Your Lightify account username and password should be sufficient to get you into the developers API area. There you can create a new client which will generate your client ID and password. The new process (since 4/1/2018) is oAuth2, so you'll need to set up a receiving page on a server to get the access code from the login process, then use that to get the ...


3

Yes, the inside of the lighting fixture is a suitable place to add additional circuitry. You should bear in mind that the fluorescent tube load is more demanding on it's switching circuit than a simple resistive load, but with a typical domestic tube being rated at less than 80 watts, the risk of overloading the switch should be low. Many of these fixtures ...


3

I believe the Ilumi light bulb gets as close to this as you can get. It uses bluetooth instead of wifi, but the principle is mostly the same. Basically, the situation is the following: If the light switch is turned on, you can control the lights over bluetooth. If the light switch is turned off, the light (and the whole system) is off no matter what. You ...


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