10

TL;DR: Economics Wired mesh network vs. star topology Well, the Internet is a mesh network. Why? Because DARPA wanted it to work even if half the United States were bombed into oblivion if the cold war was going hot. The military wanted a highly reliable network that is not dependent on any single node. Meshing or at least partial meshing your network ...


7

If you're not married to Zigbee's flavor of 802.15.4, you should take a look at Helium's end-to-end wireless capabilities. (I work for them - naturally.) Our module uses the same PHY but pushes most of the MAC trickiness into the cloud. And there is no meshing (which tends to drain batteries faster and complicate security). Instead it's a star-of-stars ...


7

You say you built a Zigbee network using Digimesh protocol. The thing is that this is an impossibility: Zigbee and Digimesh are competing solutions for mesh network, not something you use together. See this link: Digimesh manufacturer explains the difference between Zigbee and Digimesh Digimesh uses Sleep Modes 7 and 8 whereas Zigbee uses 4 and 5. Have you ...


7

Mesh networks tend to give better local configuration options for an IoT network. Range extension was already mention which the mesh network as each device in the network will help make the network bigger than each device would be alone. Another important aspect is how the messages are routed. While some devices will remain stationary, others may be moved ...


7

It is actually possible to allow for sleeping nodes without the need for time synchronization. The basic idea is to send a message multiple times until the node finally wakes up. There is of course a lot of room for clever optimization, so there are hundreds of MAC layer approaches based on this idea. But since your question specifically asks for MAC layers,...


7

That is a very good question and actually my current research topic. I try to give an adequate but concise answer¹. I will focus my answers to networks based on the IEEE 802.15.4 standard (Zigbee and 6LoWPAN both use it as physical and data link layer) as well as networks where most traffic goes through a common gateway. Most arguments also hold for peer-to-...


6

Another option to easy mesh is to use painlessMesh by BlackEdder and introduce there a bridge for commuting the data to outer world. There is an issue on connecting to other network from a mesh in painlessMesh gitlab that explains four different solutions. Solutions maybe work also in easyMesh, because the issue was raised initially there, but for sure in ...


5

HEYU is a text-based console program for remotely controlling lights and appliances in the home or office. The complete source is made available under the GNU GPLv3 license. Heyu uses the CM11A computer interface to send and receive X10 control signals over the AC power lines to modules which can turn On, Off, or Dim attached lamps or appliances. It can ...


5

I would modify a bit the existing implementation of EasyMesh, as currently it does not seem to implement node roles. Each node is equal and they can build connections only with each other. As I see there is no way to add a server to their routing tables nor to mark a specific connection record in the tables that has connectivity to a server. The nodes use a ...


5

I posted this same question to the Microsoft forums and got a reply from IoTGirl saying that WiFi Direct is an option: Windows IoT Core WiFi Mesh I need to confirm whether the RPi3B supports WiFi Direct and then also find out if it supports many-to-many via WiFi Direct. (if anyone has any experience on this, feedback would be much appreciated) Hope ...


5

The rated range of Z-Wave devices in general is designed for indoor "perfect conditions" so if the max range of a device is 100 ft. that assumes no noise and no interference. If you have any other devices on similar frequencies or objects that may attenuate the signal, it most likely will never achieve that range. In an environment with a lot of devices (not ...


5

Yes and no. Both technologies are concerning different levels of providing connectivity. Usually mesh networking is provided by level 3 or 4 or even both of the ISO OSI model, depending on the extend of implementation. The network and transport layers provide the basic reliability of the mesh network. That reliability is usually not impeded when a node ...


5

IoT is often used in home automation contexts (door sensors, wallplugs,...) and they tend to be very far each other especially in big houses. So a mesh network allows objets to cover the distance problem. Also, all these IoT devices must run low on energy so they must not waste it on long distance communications.


4

If you consider that the internet is a mesh network of sorts, you should see your answer in the broadest terms. Asking is a specific mesh network has any scalability issues is slightly different. There is plenty of scope to architect a modified network protocol to address a specific implementation, with the right sort of optimisations. At some point, you ...


4

I had an Ubuntu system with X10, CM11A, and heyu for several years and switched it all over to a Raspberry Pi about 4 years ago. I then replicated it twice for my parents, and a sibling. It can be a pain to get it all working, but once it does, it's great. I have Python scripts that follow the heyu log files to generate alarms. Other scripts use heyu for ...


4

I would suggest painless mesh or easy mesh. Their Github pages (on the links) say specifically that they are for esp8266 and thus they are very cost effective.


3

Not sure what your range is, but short range you can use ANT Blaze as well. It's great for continuous data rates. ANT radios I think consume ~20mA at max power. I think module cost is in your price range as well, and if you wanted to go so far, you could build your application into the radio as it has space to run an application alongside the radio.


2

In general, if it is connected to mains power, it’s a router, whereas if it is battery-powered it’s an end device. Not sure this is 100% true, but probably very close to it. This page shows it is an FFD (full function device), so it can act as a router.


2

The mesh network element really in this context is referring to how the Google Pod access points communicate with each other to extend the signal range. It is highly likely the myQ will work perfectly fine connected to this WiFi network without any mesh-related complication. In the event it doesn't you could simply re-enable the WiFi feature on your ISP-...


1

Had a conversation with the folks over at Painlessmesh. There is a way, but it's not meant to be invoked directly: https://gitlab.com/painlessMesh/painlessMesh/issues/276


1

https://www.instructables.com/id/XBee-Mesh-Network-Construction/ XBee seems to support mesh networks almost out of the box. https://circuitdigest.com/microcontroller-projects/raspberry-pi-xbee-module-interfacing#:~:text=So%2C%20before%20using%20the%20XBee,the%20laptop%20using%20USB%20cable. Interfacing with a Raspberry Pi or similar computer system may be ...


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