27

Blockchain, Gada explains, is “a suitable solution in at least three aspects of IoT, including big data management, security and transparency, as well as facilitation of micro-transactions based on the exchange of services between interconnected smart devices.” Big data management: I couldn't disagree more. Blockchains are inherently inefficient at ...


26

There are some potential misconceptions or misunderstandings in the question that will be addressed in this post. In Diagram 2, it shows a representation of the software "stack" that a computer (PC) would use to create, process, and send a message, across the internet, to another computer Do all kinds of computers - smartphones/tv's/gameconsoles, ...


24

The absolute most common issue with IoT devices is default passwords. So change all the passwords. Pick a unique, random password for every device and write it down on paper (paper is safe from remote attackers and hard drive failures). 12 random (i.e. computer-generated) lowercase letters represent a good compromise between security and being hard to type. ...


23

Blockchains have applications on IoT devices, but there's nothing about IoT which makes blockchains more or less applicable. The specific threats mentioned in the article are: Malware. Blockchain does nothing to prevent this. The router/camera/DVR vulnerabilities were mostly due to poor design. Firmware verification (when implemented, which is rare) is ...


22

As always, a big part of security with "connect from anywhere" setups is ensuring the security of your account information. The usual rules apply: Don't share your password Avoid using cookies to save passwords (although cookies are always hard to resist) Regularly change passwords Be aware of other breaches via email (phishing, scams, etc.) including ...


18

This is not a straightforward topic. Detecting a compromise, as you put it, can happen in many forms and result in multiple outcomes in terms of system or network behavior. Observing that may require knowing the difference between normal and suspicious in terms of system and network behavior. For a home solution at the network level, the recommended option ...


17

What is the best approach to partitioning IoT device in the home? I have heard of setting up separate networks, one for IoT devices and one for everything else. Is this approach secure enough? Well, technically, there is no such thing as absolute security. Doing so should be technically safe enough, if we consider that your router doesn't have any ...


17

Detecting the infected device These devices-turned-botnet will still function correctly for the unsuspecting owner, apart from the occasional sluggish bandwidth, and their botnet behavior may go unnoticed indefinitely. Webroot.com: Source Code for Mirai IoT Malware Released This tells us how the device changes its behavior. Occasional sluggish bandwidth ...


16

This is beyond trivial. Every somewhat sophisticated IoT device will communicate via HTTPS making it not too easy to know what it is talking about, even if you do have a not compromised internet gateway in your router. Unfortunately you can't know which end points the IoT device is supposed to talk to and which not. While most of the big consumer ...


14

Yes, Mosquitto does support multiple brokers. Mosquitto uses MQTT Bridges to connect multiple brokers thus routing messages between these mosquitto brokers. This way a bridge between your primary broker to a fallback system can be established. Avoid creating loops though. If both brokers run your clients publish to the primary broker which then publishes ...


13

Adding to the most basic IoT security rule Gilles details, the first rule of security at home is to secure your entry gate adequately. Proper settings on your router will stop most attacks in their tracks. If your router is not properly configured securing the devices behind it is moot. A compromised router means you have the possibility for man-in-the-...


12

I think you'll find a fairly high percentage of "#5, Other", because the list is missing one of the most common consumer IoT architectures: indirect communications via an in-home gateway. All the other methods you describe have drawbacks in the home: they're hard to configure, they're not secure, or they take a lot of expensive server resources. An in-...


12

Do all kinds of computers - smartphones/tv's/gameconsoles, etc use this format? For something to exchange on the internet, it will have to go through an IP stack somewhere. Does the OS matter? The IP protocol is defined by a the RFC 791, so the OS/Firmware has to comply to it, whatever it is. (In this regard) is there any difference between ...


11

At this point, the complexity of what you want is beyond "cheap, single-board computer" levels. The easiest solution available is to set up something like SNORT, which is an intrusion detection system. Initially, it will alert you to everything that's going on, and you'll get way too many false positives. By training it over time (itself a manual process) ...


11

In a typical LoRaWAN network, gateways are dumb devices, as explained by the LoRa Alliance: LoRaWAN network architecture is typically laid out in a star-of-stars topology in which gateways is a transparent bridge relaying messages between end-devices and a central network server in the backend. So, a gateway only needs to be configured to connect to some ...


11

Lightweight devices, and couple of bytes date rates ask for using MQTT, as it has already been mentioned. Your sensor nodes could be based on standalone ESP8266 modules which are powerful enough to host an MQTT client implementation. Or you can simply use these modules as an AT command controlled Wi-Fi module along with your external microcontrollers. You ...


11

Imagine your network as a Venn diagram where one set is LoraWan and the other is MQTT. Elements in the sets should know only about their set(s). So nodes using LoraWan (are in the LoraWan set) do not have to bother with MQTT or with the server. They just send/receive data to/from the Gateway. The Gateway is the end of their world. The Gateway is in the ...


10

In .NET the implementation allows to connect one client to one broker, so I'd say why not... MqttClient mqtt; string broker = ini.getData("MQTT", "hostname"); mqtt = new MqttClient(broker); mqtt.MqttMsgPublishReceived += mqtt_received; mqtt.Connect(Guid.NewGuid().ToString()); Thing is, you must manage duplicates in case of a fallback when the other broker ...


10

TL;DR: Economics Wired mesh network vs. star topology Well, the Internet is a mesh network. Why? Because DARPA wanted it to work even if half the United States were bombed into oblivion if the cold war was going hot. The military wanted a highly reliable network that is not dependent on any single node. Meshing or at least partial meshing your network ...


10

Disable Universal Plug and Play If you don't need it, it can also pose a security risk. A virus, Trojan horse, worm, or other malicious program that manages to infect a computer on your local network can use UPnP, just like legitimate programs can. While a router normally blocks incoming connections, preventing some malicious access, UPnP could allow a ...


10

No, not at all. Using Tor does not make your computer system more secure from attacks. What it does is to make your computer system more anonymous: it makes it hard for a remote computer that you communicate with to correlate your access with other elements of your identity such as your geographical location and what other accounts and sites you may be ...


10

Blockchain technology provides a distributed transaction record. New data is appended to the chain and encrypted by multiple parties. The encryption process is compute intensive which makes it relatively hard for the data to be either corrupted or retrospectively modified. The most well known application of the blockchain is in enabling financial ...


10

Maybe I missed the point of the question, but I think this is a good start at an answer. You need three things, at a minimum. An always-on compute node to aggregate your data. This does not need to be powerful, It could be a process running on your NAS, or even (in theory) on your router. For simplicity, assume it is a Raspberry Pi. This could also provide ...


10

You've questioned both previous answers about the need for a controller/hub. Consider that to make things happen, you need rules to exist. If you want to push a big red button to open a garage door, some rule has to tie the sensor (button) to the desired action (opening the door). There are two ways to make that happen: you can put the rule directly in the ...


10

If you can't port forward your router, you might have to resort to hole punching: Hole punching is a technique in computer networking for establishing a direct connection between two parties in which one or both are behind firewalls or behind routers that use network address translation (NAT). To punch a hole, each client connects to an unrestricted third-...


10

The question 'Securing small home automation setup' provides a useful reference for general security tips, but there are also some specific steps you should follow to keep your Raspberry Pi secure. Steve Robillard's answer to a question on Raspberry Pi Stack Exchange outlines some of the specific issues with using a Pi that you can address, such as changing ...


10

If you are using an ESP8266 the built in Smart Config feature can achieve this. An example can be found here: ESP8266 Arduino WiFiSmartConfig.ino. The important steps are to set to STA mode: WiFi.mode(WIFI_STA); Then start looking for the smart config packets: WiFi.beginSmartConfig(); Finally check for the config to be complete: WiFi.smartConfigDone() ...


9

In answer to the first question - yes, it is possible in a pragmatic sense, and running a separate network will not appreciably impede functionality, assuming the separate network is given sufficient access to the Internet to allow basic connectivity from the device(s) in question to its / their respective "home base" services. In answer to the second ...


9

Using Tor means that the people who run Tor exit nodes, because they are charitable people, can run man-in-the-middle on you. This means you open yourself up to attacks that you wouldn't get if you don't use Tor. As a result depending on your threat model it could decrease the security in this case.


9

My first thought is that when I am getting ready to go somewhere on business, I can say "Alexa, when I have finished brushing my hair, please find me an apartment in Timbuktu using AirBnB, then book me a flight and an Uber ride to the airport and arrange for a drone to deliver the tickets to me wherever I am by tracking the location of my FitBit and don'...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible