9

Your most future proof solutions will be those which fully separate the hardware from the protocol. Your example HS200 light switch joins many smart outlets in being based on an Embedded Linux system (the source is available in TP Link's GPL Code Center) Chances are, like most of the outlets, the underlying system is one derived from a strange vendor ...


6

It sounds like you should be looking for a complete IoT device management platform - there are too many complicated aspects of scalability, security, provisioning and firmware update for this to be a sensible thing to try and develop in house from scratch. Make sure you pick a platform which uses open standards. To answer your question more directly, each ...


5

One good way to access devices scattered around in private networks is using MQTT for communication. In MQTT server publishes messages on topics and devices can subscribe to them and thus get notified when new content arrives to the topic. There are solutions available around the web, you either pick one or implement your own. Main idea is to make a ...


5

Distributed Tracing The idea behind any worthwhile distributed tracing is most commonly known described in this Google whitepaper about their Dapper solution. Note that I'm not saying they invented it. In essence it works the same for IoT, just start the trace at the edge, either of your backend or even on the end devices. While the Google whitepaper is ...


4

It sounds like you need what is called "hairpin" NAT (wikipedia link). This is a capability of your Home/Office router. This means that if you try to connect to the WAN/ISP side of router from inside your network it will "turn round" the request and follow the port forwarding rules to access the internal service. With this in place then you would configure ...


4

I've been buying Sonoff smart plugs on eBay lately and flashed them with custom firmware. This is possible because they are based on the ESP8266. They are very affordable and pretty advanced. They need to be opened and a pin header soldered onto the PCB, then you have to program them with a FTDI adapter, which you can also get cheap on eBay. It's pretty ...


4

As Chris said, the key is to separate the protocol from the hardware. But that doesn't mean you have to implement your own firmware! You can choose a switch that supports a common and readily available home automation protocol, such as Z-Wave or Insteon. These are closed protocols, but there is a wide variety of manufacturers that create interoperable ...


4

I wonder if another solution would be to have your Raspberry Pi PUSH the feed out to a cloud server. The other answer provides the best possible way to get INTO your pi from outside, but if you don't need to do that, if you just want occasional security camera-style images, you could script something that would watch a folder, and when a new image appears, ...


4

The problem you're trying to solve is called NAT traversal, where you're trying to communicate with another device while using carrier-grade NAT. Potentially, you could proxy all of your packets through a server, using a protocol like SOCKS. This probably won't scale exceptionally well, but if you don't plan to have too many clients, it's probably acceptable....


4

Non-IP devices by definition are not addressable over the Internet, so the concepts of port forwarding and UPnP do not apply. Instead, the hub has to provide a translation service. There are various standard and non-standard ways to do this. For example, a non-standard way to control a Z-Wave device might be for the gateway to run custom software that ...


3

Anything that receives commands or software updates over a radio is open to attack, it doesn't necessarily need to be initiated via a internet connection. E.g. http://iotworm.eyalro.net/ Or it doesn't even need a radio https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stuxnet


3

In the configuration.py file, i hope you are using double quotes while parsing string arguments as the output which you are receiving, maximum time we miss those quotes only while changing arguments. If this doesn't help please go through the appended link: https://www.home-assistant.io/docs/ecosystem/hass-configurator/#configuration-ui-for-home-assistant


2

Assuming you can drive this via MIDI as @jcaron suggests to get it to do what you want, you are still going to have to write a lot of code here. Some key points Booking/Locking, you are going to need a way to divide up time on the device since only one student will be able to use it at once You will need to map all the interface options between the web page ...


1

All 3 of the options you have described are valid options, but they all depend on what infrastructure you already have or are prepared to deploy and how much you want to spend. DDNS - this will very much depend on the cellular network you are using and they type of contract you have with them. Most cellular data providers use something called Carrier Grade ...


1

@Uraty try ubidots. It provides excellent dashboard which allow you to easily configure your devices and create UI in few mouse clicks. You may also try another simpler service called Freeboard for same purpose.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible