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9

There are several differences between the Norton Core and a normal router. 1. Deep Packet inspection. From TrustedReviews.com: The Core is a combination of Symantec's pre-existing security knowhow and some new features we’ve not seen before. The router will inspect every packet of data that passes through it for known pieces of malware and other ...


7

1,000 clients can easily be handled by any decent MQTT broker; there's a benchmark from Scalagent which shows that a PC with: a 3 GHz Intel Core 2 Duo processor 4 GB of RAM could handle 60,000 publishers running Mosquitto. This is far in excess of your required 1,000 publishers, so even on a relatively weak server, you should still be able to handle the ...


7

The virus you've heard about is probably Mirai. We've had a few questions recently that might be helpful to read for context, because your question covers several aspects of those: How can I check if my IoT devices are infected with the Mirai worm? Securing small home automation setup In theory, if your router prevents all incoming connections, it makes ...


7

From the sounds of what you're trying to do I think you'll be fine, and obviously the outcome will depend on the router you get. (I'm going to use Ubiquiti as an example) According to a Ubiquiti employee the hard-coded limit on concurrent connections is set to 50 million: https://community.ubnt.com/t5/EdgeMAX/Maximum-number-of-Connections-Sessions/m-p/...


6

@Aurora0001 has already addressed the big things: undoubtedly, a Mirai attack you heard of. As he said, change your passwords off of the defaults - and not to something obvious. Here's a list of almost 60 user names and passwords that Mirai aims to hit: 666666 666666 888888 888888 admin (none) admin 1111 admin 1111111 admin 1234 admin 12345 ...


5

Every networked device connected to your router has a MAC address, which is specifically linked to one device, unlike local IP addresses in your private network, which are assigned by your router and don't have to be permanent. Generally, local IPs are assigned sequentially, often starting at 192.168.0.1, then 192.168.0.2 and so on, as described by How-To ...


5

The router configuration portal has DHCP-->'Address Reservation' under Advanced settings. This way MAC address to IP address reservation can be achieved.


5

It is important to identify whether the problem is : Devices or network deployment Devices or network configuration. Devices Hardware (or firmware versions) Environment Security configuration The paths to take here are too diverse so you need to narrow down the cases. Sometimes a photo helps to spot the possible deployment issues. Here are some ideas:...


5

You can use persistent sessions from clients, e.g. clean flag set to false upon connect. In that scenario event when your client is offline broker will buffer message for it into own cache and deliver it once device will connect. About the quantity - 10K is a relatively low amount even for one server. You can configure Linux server to hold 500K active ...


4

A more structured allocation might be better, because you are very tight for available time slots. I think you need to run some monte-carlo simulations of your proposed system too (and check that you can first replicate your current failure timescale). I'd suggest to incrementally slow-down any endpoint which is polling, but failing. Your steady-state ...


4

The problem with IoT is that oftentimes you can't or won't get an update to the device, or can't make meaningful security changes to the device. Securing your network is a lengthy discussion with tons of options. The profession is called InfoSec (Information Security). It's a burgeoning profession, or so I hear. Steve Gibson of GRC recommends a "3 dumb ...


4

I'm pleased to see that this product exists, and hope that other vendors of routers follow suit. The solution to recent consumer IoT security problems lies in the intelligence of the home network that is wrapped in the router. We will never get cheap-as-possible manufacturers to implement some yet-to-be-defined security protocol. And, as much as we try and ...


3

No, the connection will still be encrypted, but the services that depend on it like WPS (Wireless Protected Setup) won't work. WPS is a simple way to setup the WIFI connection by pressing a button in the router after setting the connecting device into WPS mode, but when the SSID is not being broadcasted the device can't find it and WPS won't Work. The ...


3

I feel your approach is flawed by your 5th point: "I need to keep the per-device cost low, so cannot put Ethernet on each device." Look at it versus "I'll reinvent a layer 1 protocol and all the needed hardware to handle it" and think if it really lower your overall cost. BTW the main problem on a network is the collisions of informations from multiples ...


2

One way to get some isolation between your wired networks is for each of you to have your own dedicated router. The WAN port of each of your routers is wired to a LAN port of the ISP's router. To the ISP router, there are only two clients, Router You and Router Brother. Each of the You and Brother routers are configured as normal for a router. They have ...


1

All your devices are opening persistent connections out to the cloud. They will be using a messaging based protocol (e.g. MQTT) rather than a request/response protocol like HTTP. Messages flow both ways over these types of protocols, with the bulbs updating the cloud with their current state and the cloud sending commands to change state.


1

It probably won't do the battery much good as Lithium Ion batteries actually prefer to only be charged between 80% and 20% for the majority of the time to last the longest. If you need a permanently powered 4G hotspot then it might be worth looking for 4G home broadband providers. e.g. EE in the UK do a plan that comes with a 4G devices designed to be ...


1

In addition to very nice discussion above, you can be own security expert starting with nmap, flagship tool from Insecure.Org so you can perform basic scan of target device(192.168.1.1) with simple command: [nmap -A -T4 192.168.1.1] More details, examples and hints how to scan yours network could be found on Nmap Cheat Sheet pages. However, scan every ...


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