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DOORS!!! I don't know if it is in the scope of your question but you can't imagine the wasted energy of opening/closing a door! A French comic strip named Gaston Lagaffe written in 1970 introduced a person who harvested the energy of an opening door to press oranges, print a picture, make coffee,... EDIT, thanks to to Olivier Dulac's comment I was able to ...


24

The absolute most common issue with IoT devices is default passwords. So change all the passwords. Pick a unique, random password for every device and write it down on paper (paper is safe from remote attackers and hard drive failures). 12 random (i.e. computer-generated) lowercase letters represent a good compromise between security and being hard to type. ...


21

As always, a big part of security with "connect from anywhere" setups is ensuring the security of your account information. The usual rules apply: Don't share your password Avoid using cookies to save passwords (although cookies are always hard to resist) Regularly change passwords Be aware of other breaches via email (phishing, scams, etc.) including ...


20

Wireless and Bluetooth are very close technologies. But, when to choose between one of them you have to consider many things. Speed: Bluetooth 4.0 offers 25 Mbps while WiFi Direct can offer you 250 Mbps. So if you want a faster transfer rate, i.e. if you need to transfer large amount of data within a short time, and it is your main concern, go for WiFi. ...


19

TLDR: YES Yes, Amazon Echo will work outside of the supported countries, but some functionality will be lost. Power Amazon Echo supports 110-220 volts which means it works across the whole world without a voltage converter. Plug The Plug is localised to where ever you're buying it. I had to buy an adapter. App Amazon Echo requires a companion App. ...


19

Weeping Angel No, you were with a probability bordering on certainty not spied on by the Weeping Angel at least as described in the leaked documents. Why? The attack involved a physical component—"physically plugging a USB cable"—which makes it very unlikely that you were targeted. After all, they would have to deploy an actual physical spy to deploy that ...


18

PuTTY is actually quite secure - the session itself is encrypted. That's part of what SSH gives you "out of the box". I do a lot of this type of thing myself, and here are a few hit-points I would suggest: Don't open port 22 to the world - configure your SSH server to listen on a non-standard port (e.g. 22022 or 2222) on your WAN interface Require ...


18

Solar energy is even indoors an alternative to thermal and vibrational energy harvesting. This indoor photovoltaics use both the natural light and artificial light. On the Feasibility of Indoor Light Energy Harvesting for Wireless Sensor Networks (Carlos Carvalho and Nuno Paulino) discusses indoor light energy harvesting of the attenuated natural ...


15

Apparently Smart things uses Z-Wave protocol among others like Philips Hue. Maybe you should add your devices near the SmartThings hub for it to recognize them to check if they are compatible. However, be aware of distance, Z-Wave devices tend to always "sleep" and escape the network.


14

In my opinion, "smart switches" are a natural progression of the current switch. I assume when switch-activated fireplaces first arrived people wondered "is it safe to have a fire that is activated via a mere flip of a switch?" Use common sense, and treat the smart switch with the same care as you would your current switch. Lastly, I cannot speak to your ...


14

The other answers cover a lot of the technologies that you can use to protect your system. Here are some more general thoughts/philosophies. A DMZ is your friend - In almost every case where you have a service facing an external network a DMZ (see a.) will be very beneficial. In this case it will both minimize the attack surface and minimize the damage. By ...


13

Adding to the most basic IoT security rule Gilles details, the first rule of security at home is to secure your entry gate adequately. Proper settings on your router will stop most attacks in their tracks. If your router is not properly configured securing the devices behind it is moot. A compromised router means you have the possibility for man-in-the-...


13

There is no 'standard practice' for this sort of application to date. Simple, insecure, remote electrical switching is accepted practice - provided the switch hardware complies with the normal electrical safety regulations. Any gas-powered device ought to be designed to be safe in unattended operation, with blow-out detection, etc. so there should not be ...


13

Technically, different devices will communicate using protocols that are not internet-based, protocols that are proprietary, and tied together with different administration tools. The reality is, particularly in consumer IoT, that you are witnessing an important battle between vendors that have an interest in dominating the consumer IoT (or home automation) ...


12

As with all smart devices it completely depends on their security level. As such you have to evaluate the security level of the specific smart switch to determine its safety level. If the smart switch is adequately secured one could reasonably consider it a better solution because you are able to disable your fireplace from without the confines of your own ...


12

In general Bluetooth equipment always comes with a proprietary app for your phone... I think that if you want to have the control over your Bluetooth switches, you might want to take a look at Arduino Bluetooth modules and command relays on it to toggle normal lamps.


12

There are a few aspects to consider, and the answer will depend a lot on your exact situation. Customisation Smart switches will allow far more choice in lighting overall, since you can use any bulb that would work normally. As noted in this CNet article: With a smart switch, you're free to use whatever bulb you want -- perfect if you're picky about ...


12

Yes there are several reasons. This blog post explains it about the Echo and the wake word Alexa. I'll summarize a bit. Wake word recognition is done locally and in real-time. That limits the lengths of the wake word due to obvious processing limitations. Furthermore users don't want to recite a poem to activate the smart assistant. Thus, it has to be ...


12

While having so much valuable answers to my question I have also done some further research about the topic. I have found an additional harvesting solution and also a great reference design about a wireless, solar energy powered sensor node, without using a battery. First the additional method from Texas Instruments, which is called RF switch harvesting ...


12

I think you'll find a fairly high percentage of "#5, Other", because the list is missing one of the most common consumer IoT architectures: indirect communications via an in-home gateway. All the other methods you describe have drawbacks in the home: they're hard to configure, they're not secure, or they take a lot of expensive server resources. An in-...


12

I'm drawing primarily from this article on ibtimes.com. There are several things you should realise: Weeping Angel can only infect Samsung TV's from 2012 and 2013. From the article referenced: The Weeping Angel hack only works on Samsung TVs released in 2012 or 2013. From Samsung’s 2012 lineup, the UNES8000F, E8000GF plasma and UNES7550F models are at ...


12

You can do this a little easier (missing out the hardware building) by using something like a RedRat USB Ir blaster (http://www.redrat.co.uk/products/). They also do network attached versions that you can control via ethernet. Another option is direct serial port control, LG TV's used to come with a RS232 port on the back that you could use to turn the TV ...


12

There are plenty of smart plugs, based on ESP8266 chips, which can be flashed with new firmware relatively easily. A popular (open source) firmware that has a lot of users and community support is Tasmota. This firmware is easily integrated to a locally hosted home-automation ecosystem which can be accessed remotely via the internet. The device also will ...


11

I've been exploring dropping the invocation name for Alexa custom skills myself for a couple of projects. And what I came up with after hours of reading through guides and documentations is that... It can't be done for custom skills. So, your best bet for your use case is to use Alexa Smart Home along with some smart home service. I know you said: ...


11

I know you want to use the plug to shut off the entire media center to eliminate the expense (and waste) of the standby power draw, but I would strongly recommend the simpler solution of leaving the TV plugged in 24/7, and triggering your TV's power setting using the same event that activates your smart plug. Power/Cost Modern LCD or OLED TVs sip about ...


11

Generally, you need a smart hub when some of your devices don't use Wi-Fi and can't communicate with your home network directly. Quite a lot of devices, especially sensors and actuators (like door locks and motors), use other protocols such as ZigBee, Z-Wave, Bluetooth and Thread, so they can't 'speak' directly with your Wi-Fi router. The hub acts as a ...


11

To answer your second question, yes, this attack was publicized in 2013 at Black Hat. Two Korean researchers demonstrated an attack that was developed against Android. Attacking TVs was easier than phones, because they didn't have to worry about excessive battery draining giving away the existence of the bug. The link above is to the slide presentation. ...


11

The bulbs themselves do not generate data. You might see data being generated by a building management system, where sensors are used to determine where and how to light the rooms. It's conceivable that a smart-home lighting system can generate analytics based on user requests for lighting, but there is nothing obviously interesting about this data (even ...


11

The Google Home and Amazon Echo use microphone arrays to enhance 'far-field recognition' (i.e. recognising your voice from a reasonable distance with good accuracy). The Echo uses a 7-microphone array (image from iFixit, with the microphones in green) and the Google Home uses a 2-mic array (iFixit; in yellow). Amazon's 7-Mic Array is open for developers ...


11

The IKEA Trådfri lighting system is all CoAP based, you can find my write up on the protocol here Belkin WeMo devices are all uPnP and SOAP controlled as well so another open/self describing protocol


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