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There are plenty of smart plugs, based on ESP8266 chips, which can be flashed with new firmware relatively easily. A popular (open source) firmware that has a lot of users and community support is Tasmota. This firmware is easily integrated to a locally hosted home-automation ecosystem which can be accessed remotely via the internet. The device also will ...


10

Electrical expert on diy.se with a public service announcement / context challenge. Don't buy anything that touches mains power on Amazon Amazon is a river of cheap Chinese junk. Amazon lets anyone (i.e. The Ebay/Alibaba crowd) sell on their platform. This is called the Amazon Marketplace, and consists of any listing that says "Ships from and sold by ...


3

That diagram is describing Google Assistant's Local Control SDK. When using the Local Control SDK you write some JavaScript that is executed on the a Google Home/Home Mini/Nest Hub to send control messages over the local network to the device you want to control. (You still need to have a full cloud setup for the local control to work as well, docs for how ...


3

If you want a US-based smart plug/switch company why don't you go for Wemo switches/plugs, a subsidiary of Belkin. You can also make your own smart plugs then there will be no issue of privacy and security. You can customize as you want. You can create it using a simple AC outlet of your choice, ESP-12, Hi-Link 240AC to 3.3V DC, 3.3V relay and some wires. ...


3

You can use skills such as the My Reader skill, which can read any text you send to it through its servers. Once you have set it up, the steps are as follows. How to use - Quick Start Send the URL to 619-473-2337 (6194READER) from your phone by following steps for different browsers on your phone: https://s3.amazonaws.com/reader.help/...


3

Instead of looking to Wi-Fi-connected smart plugs, there are Z-Wave solutions which functionally do about the same thing. You'd need some sort of Z-Wave "hub" to connect to it and collect the running information though. Something like OpenHAB can do this, although I imagine there are finished products that can do it to (although you'd have to look into how "...


2

Looks like you've answered your own question :) Yes - a wifi controllable interface (likr Sonoff) hooked to act as the trigger for the contactor relay is probably your best/cheapest option. Saves you the issue of coding your own I/O control and easily manages overall power requirements.


2

According to the TV model groups of the Samsung Smart TV developer site, the UE6300 series uses TV SDK 4.1, which is part of the "legacy" versions (newer versions use Tizen). You can find the relevant software here (in the "Samsung TV SDK for Legacy Platform" section, selecting version 4.1. Documentation is available here. Since this is now an 8-year old "...


1

All you need is 2 Resistors and then any microcontroller with a 3.3v GPIO input pin (e.g. ESP8266) You need to build a voltage divider, the equations on that page will help you work out what the ratio of the 2 resistor values needs to be (But something like 20 kohm and 7.5 kohm should be in the right ball park). You can also use this calculator to do the ...


1

I got it working! It was pretty easy when you got the right idea. I use the IP's of the phones. I configured them to be static in my network. Then, I wrote a little Python script that pings both IP-addresses. If one of the two is online, TV should be turned on. If both are offline, TV should be turned off.


1

It sounds like you need to run a DHCP server on your AP to hand out addresses in the 10.0.0.0/24 range. This should make sure it sends an empty Option 3 value so no default gateway is sent to the phone. This will let the phone know it can only reach devices in the 10.0.0.0/24 range via this network and it should keep it's current default route. E.g. to do ...


1

Yes, for the most part both Amazon and Google require that the Hardware vendor run a service that supports their specific API that the Voice Assistant systems can call. For Amazon you have to provide a AWS Lambda function as the interface and Google require a HTTP API endpoint. There are some exceptions to these rules, e.g. Amazon support direct control of ...


1

It was intentionally omitted for security reason, you do not want anyone (hacker or intruder when integrated with other smart home like Alexa and others) to open the door.


1

One possibility would be a Shelly Button with a Shelly 1 inside. It can use its own firmware or be flashed by something like ESPHome (both are supported in Home Assistant) The setup is not cheap, though (~12€ piece)


1

Answer from shelly support is: About ""Device is owned from another customer" 3 years ago we never expect to sell so much devices and the unick IDs running out. All new devices which we manifacturing now using whole MAC address as ID instead last 6 digits. Everyone who has this issue need to send a message to Dimitar Stanishev or Me, to provide a ...


1

This will entirely depend on your monitor. If it supports HDMI CEC then the Chromecast will be able to change the input source to the HDMI when it starts to play something, but you won't be able to switch back to the Mac input via Google Assistant. CEC is not normally available on monitors, it is normally reserved for TVs that have multiple devices as ...


1

You will need to pair the Smart Speaker with the TV in some way for this to work. Modern TV's support Bluetooth headphones/sound bars. I don't believe the Chromecast (This is the device actually doing the playback even when commanded via the smart speaker) can split it's audio output from the video, both of which will be output over the HDMI link.


1

You don't "flash" software to a pi in the same way you do a micro controller based device. You can easily update software OTA (over the air) to a Raspberry pi, just by copying the files to the device and restarting the application. If you want to automate this sort of thing then using a service like balena.io will do it for you. You just need to package ...


1

I'll answer myself. Home Assistant is just enough to implement almost anything I've wanted. I've tried OpenHAB and it was waaaay too long until I was able to automate anything. Also I got really confused with it's Dashboards, doesn't look like an easy to enter solution. On the other hand, I gave a shot to Home Assistant and within just a weekend I've ...


1

You can't. I have the 50 inch model with the same crappy TV4 apps. (COMPLETE GARBAGE) TCL NEEDS to be embarrassed by loading such garbage. The only option is to either purchase an android box (NVIDA Shield) or some other external streaming device like a Roku or Firestick. Our "smart" tvs are forced to remain DUMB.


1

If you switch to Bulb Energy, they have an integration with Samsung SmartThings - https://bulb.co.uk/blog/were-partnering-with-samsung-to-help-you-get-more-out-of-your-smart-meter Although, after having had Bulb fit smart meters this morning, the only data I have available via the SmartThings integration in Home Assistant is the electricity used so far in ...


1

The bulbs, in fact, do generate data. They report their state to central hubs or perhaps, faraway servers, and this data can be queried, or even acted on, like a bulb that autumatically turns off during the day.


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