13

The reason that you find few implementations is most likely because CoAP is a relatively young protocol. It was first proposed in 2010, and the current version dates from 2014: RFC 7252. For application level protocols the popular alternatives are HTTP, which is heavy for constrained devices, and MQTT, which requires a broker device and runs on TCP. They ...


11

UL (formerly Underwriters Laboratories) provide the Cybersecurity Assurance Program to certify that an Internet of Things device is, in their opinion, secure from most major threats. UL seem to be highly respected in their certification processes, according to Ars Technica: UL, the 122-year-old safety standards organisation whose various marks (UL, ENEC, ...


10

I am unaware of any such standards. As pointed out in the answers to the other question, pub/sub doesn't lend itself to RPC but it can be bent to fit. One of MQTT's strengths is that the payload can be anything at all, allowing a developer to make the best choice for their project.


8

Basile, I think that we are missing a fine distinction here. When you speak of a Posix like standard for IoT, I think that you are speaking of libraries which wrap a protocol. As one who has been employed for (cough) decades implementing protocol stacks for telephony and satellite communication, I can say (as you are probably aware) that these protocols ...


8

A lot of people have struggled with this. No charter appears to be forthcoming, because the interests of the cloud providers lies in locking their hardware users in, based on the potential future profits to be made from subscribers. The more dependent you are upon their cloud, the more you'll be theoretically willing to pay for continued service (note that ...


7

My recommendation is MQTT. Versatile, lightweight and modular, it can even run on a ESP8266 (Hub and client). The MQTT protocol is available for many platforms from embedded, mobile devices and up to big fat OS's like MAC, Windows and Linux. The protocol have a Publisher, Subscriber model for the communication. And a QoS so a Hub can remember if a ...


7

About IoT protocols, most commonly HTTP, CoAP and MQTT are used on communication. HTTP and CoAP are suitable for REST type of client(s) to server communication and MQTT supports publishing and subscribing based multi user communication, where the origin can easily be from server to client, client to server and even client to client. Answering the question:...


7

You only need to start involving qualified people for fairly major work. Minor alternations can be done yourself so long as they are done properly. What you are proposing doesn't sound like it would require notification. You can find out more about what is and isn't regulated in the Part P FAQ. Small alternations and general DIY work is specifically ...


7

Most smart plugs I have come across are Wi-Fi controlled devices. I expect the regulations would be similar to those imposed on a Wi-Fi router such as Technicolor's TG582n. RTTE Directive 1999/5/EC: Radio and Telecommunications Terminal Equipment. Commission Regulation (EC) No 1275/2008 implementing Directive 2009/105/EC: Ecodesign requirements ...


7

I think this will be difficult to answer, ask three lawyers get four answers, not to mention that it is something in the future. However, I would argue, that not each device (in the technical sense) would be required to comply with this rule. Consider a use case where smart devices work without an external or cloud-based data service, e.g. a smart home ...


7

This is a very good question, I'd like to offer my point of view in the matter. Arm has designed their processor with the embedded world as target, so they thought about every thing with this target in mind: size energy consumption instructions ease of use scalability I'm mostly working with Linux, and when you're developing product with Arm it's way ...


6

The WiFi we know and use now also share the 2.4 GHz frequency range with a lot of other technologies and applications which might interfere. If we have a look on the list of 2.4 GHz radio usage, a couple of items are there beside WiFi. Many cordless telephones and baby monitors in the United States and Canada use the 2.4GHz frequency, the same frequency at ...


6

There are two aspects to this regulatory regime which you need to understand the impact of. Accept interference. One of the constraints of an amateur license is that continuous transmission is restricted. The underlying assumption is of a 2-way human-to-human conversation, so transmit time is unlikely to be longer than 15 minutes continuous. Beacons and ...


6

I am answering your title - which does not seem to match your question. 3GPP is a standards body. Back when I was first programming telephone exchanges, the US standards were set by BellCore and the European standards by the CCCIT, which was renamed as the IT-U. Those covered ISDN & ISUP, then, later GSM, and GPRS. Analog(ue) technology was considered ...


5

I would imagine the same restrictions would apply to Smart Plugs and any other electrical device equally; there does not seem to be any specific legislation that applies to IoT devices. The UK Government (which, despite the recent Brexit referendum, still respects EU law as of 2016) has published an extensive guide named Electrical equipment manufacturers: ...


5

The standards for various networking protocols are already well defined. What it sounds like you're hoping to find is an API implementing standard behaviors inherent to IoT devices. Something like a Light() function that can turn lights on, off, or dim them to a fraction of their brightness; DoorSensor() that can be armed or disarmed, or can register for ...


5

As quick response, I don't think that for IoT there is a special type of library, I would say that IoT is basically the "new embedded systems", they just changed the name and added the connection to the cloud. So answering to what I use for C++ programming, my reference page is http://www.cplusplus.com/ Basically for IoT you will need communication ...


4

Azure IoT Hub has a concept of direct methods: IoT Hub gives you ability to invoke direct methods on devices from the cloud. This is implemented over MQTT (AMQP is not supported), where Devices receive direct method requests on the MQTT topic: $iothub/methods/POST/{method name}/?$rid={request id}. They've wrapped this in their SDK, so developers ...


4

I am not sure what is your requirement for standardized RPC communication method over MQTT but I still made a little search around and found several points to deliver to you. First of all, about the standard method. On one Github rpc project the description kind of nails it: This module provides an rpc interface for an mqtt connection, in essence this ...


4

You could have a look at Loxone - they have integration into KNX and they also support RESTful automation. Besides that you could probably have a look at devices like recently announced Gira X1 or any KNX/IP gateway - many vendors provide some kind of interfaces. For instance, have a look at VisuControl from MDT.


4

Embedded, plus secure communications, plus provisioning (device management) plus OTA updates. This is a big software package and also emerging as a new type of platform for developing on. There are several providers offering cloud solutions, they will typically have their own client APIs and chosen endpoint operating systems. As far as I can tell, the ...


3

I think your objective is somewhat similar to BOOST: Boost C++ Libraries They aim to establish "existing practice" and provide reference implementations so that Boost libraries are suitable for eventual standardization. Perhaps Boost could be a major player in IoT: it certainly has made some great improvements to C++.


3

I haven't found any complete products. However, you can download a complete software image for the Raspberry Pi of the KNX Web Service at KNX.org. It's free. The registration can be done with bogus information and 10 minute mail. Figuring out that the password has to be numbers only wasted some time though. Anyways, after downloading that info package the ...


3

The regulations in the UK cover fixed wiring only, as far as I know. Replacing existing fittings is generally OK, it's only new or specific locations which are regulated. So if it plugs in, it's OK. If it's hard wired, I think it needs to meet the relevant standards.


3

I want to add to Aurora0001's answer that we can only protect against known threats. Recently, we've seen the Spectre and Meltdown attacks against hardware. Whilst Intel CPU's are not commonly used in IoT devices, we will probably find security problems with IoT hardware in the future. Previously we've seen Rowhammer and Heartbleed, as general system-class ...


3

The premise of your question is flawed, things like MQTT and COaP are standards.


2

I think what you mean to say is, the on field M2M communication protocols are not standardised for e.g, some devices use zigbee, some use zwave some use ble etc. So in a premises when you have multiple devices from multiple vendors all implementing different protocols like the ones mentioned above, it becomes a problem to fetch the data from all these ...


2

IoTivity is the reference implementation of the OCF Specification. You can find documentation and source code at their GitHub repository. From their list of features: Core functionality written in C for deployment to constrained devices Most functionality available from C and C++ Their Framework APIs allow discovery, data transmission, data ...


2

In short, yes the genesis is cost and energy. However there are other complexities regarding RISC (reduced instruction set computer) ARM, vs CISC (complex instruction set computer) eg Intel, and the commercial strategies of the major players. I found this to be a comprehensive discussion on the topic (though I have not cross referenced any bias). ...


2

My son implemented a cloud database system for us to share. It accepts blobs of JSON data presented by IOT devices and does some parsing on the JSON data to facilitate lookups from the DB. The header information is also JSON. The JSON blob is one field in the header. This is not a standard, but it is serviceable. If you are using a commercial site, they ...


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