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38

Check out ESP modules. I've 3 NodeMCU boards running at home checking temperature and humidity, and controlling power sockets and led strips. NodeMCU can be found for about 4-5$. If you want proper support and the chance to change the code from everyplace, take a look at Particle Photon, it's a bit more (about 20$) but works really really nice. If you ...


26

There are some potential misconceptions or misunderstandings in the question that will be addressed in this post. In Diagram 2, it shows a representation of the software "stack" that a computer (PC) would use to create, process, and send a message, across the internet, to another computer Do all kinds of computers - smartphones/tv's/gameconsoles, ...


20

Wireless and Bluetooth are very close technologies. But, when to choose between one of them you have to consider many things. Speed: Bluetooth 4.0 offers 25 Mbps while WiFi Direct can offer you 250 Mbps. So if you want a faster transfer rate, i.e. if you need to transfer large amount of data within a short time, and it is your main concern, go for WiFi. ...


18

There is Omega2 from the company Onion. They cost 5$. They are still crowdfunding, therefore I'm not sure about their reliability and I haven't used one.. As @Aurora0001 pointed out, Onion completed their crowdfunding and they managed to pledge a funding 45 times more than their initial goal, which IMO makes them reliable. It has a 580 MHz CPU, 64 MB of ...


14

What you describe is actually a quite common (the most common?) way to solve the problem of integrating WiFi IoT devices into your local LAN. For example, from my experience Amazon Echo Devices are setup this way or a variety of smart switches/smart plugs (e.g. Shelly devices). Depending on your requirements, you could also get away without the LED and the ...


13

Yes, there are plenty of applications in the market already which do not rely on cloud services. The heirarchy of complexity which a user may choose to install with a specific product goes something like this: Device with dedicated remote control Device with phone app and in-house link node Node linked to cloud for user remote access by phone (tunneling and ...


13

As an even cheaper alternative to the NodeMCU from Luis answer I would like to mention the the bare ESP-12E or ESP-12F*, the module that is used on the NodeMCU. They are even cheaper than the NodeMCU, draw less power (because they are lacking the USB converter) and can be powered directly from a 3V battery. You'll need one USB-to-serial converter (3.3V**, ...


13

One that I have been keeping an eye on, but haven't tried yet, is VoCore. It was also crowdfunded like the Omega2. It promises a $4-$18 device, but the ones available start at $17.99. What is relevant about VoCore is that it has fully open source hardware and software. So you can, in theory, get to a low per-unit price at scale. Technical details and source ...


12

Do all kinds of computers - smartphones/tv's/gameconsoles, etc use this format? For something to exchange on the internet, it will have to go through an IP stack somewhere. Does the OS matter? The IP protocol is defined by a the RFC 791, so the OS/Firmware has to comply to it, whatever it is. (In this regard) is there any difference between ...


10

While you can design an IoT gadget to work via direct connection with the user's phone, a device that only works in that manner may be too limiting for many users: If the user is not at home, then they are unlikely to be able to interact with the device directly, as allowing inbound connection attempts to the home network is generally unacceptable from a ...


10

A usual method is that the IoT device sets up a temporary Wi-Fi access point. This AP can be open, or the password et cetera can even be coded into a QR Code. Such codes can easily be generated by tools like this. Try this one: The advantage is that the user has to provide the actual Wi-Fi password and both of your security risks are avoided, since that ...


10

Bluetooth Classic: If line power is available, and the application is a data intensive application such as audio streaming Bluetooth Low Energy: If the data rate is low and device is powered by battery. Wifi: Base on current available technology, if line power is available and application requires large amount of data. So for a smart home device, user base, ...


10

Defining battery life (and perhaps battery size) will tell you how long your thing has to last. That may then lead you to decide to only switch it on when (a) you need to take a reading and (b) when to transmit data. If you only want to wake up say, hourly, then you want something with a Real Time Clock (RTC) or something counting seconds either on board, ...


10

Belkin WeMo devices use uPnP and SOAP messages for control so can be easily controlled from any number of languages and options. Some details on the work I've done working out the protocol can be found here There are also the Sonoff devices that can be flashed with firmware to allow them to be controlled using MQTT IKEA's new TRÅDFRI light system use CoAP (...


10

If you are using an ESP8266 the built in Smart Config feature can achieve this. An example can be found here: ESP8266 Arduino WiFiSmartConfig.ino. The important steps are to set to STA mode: WiFi.mode(WIFI_STA); Then start looking for the smart config packets: WiFi.beginSmartConfig(); Finally check for the config to be complete: WiFi.smartConfigDone() ...


9

The Particle Electron has three free UART lines of which you can use one to connect an ESP8266 based Wi-Fi module. The ESP can be controlled via AT-Commands which is not that difficult to use. The manufacturer provides a lot of document to help you getting started. Furthermore, to make your life easier you could use a little C++ and OOP when doing your ...


9

AWS IoT Button The AWS IoT Button is a programmable button based on the Amazon Dash Button hardware. This simple Wi-Fi device is easy to configure and designed for developers to get started with AWS IoT, AWS Lambda, Amazon DynamoDB, Amazon SNS, and many other Amazon Web Services without writing device-specific code. In this article, Ted Benson talks ...


8

As your most important constraint is having a low power consumption, I think you are already paying attention to the 2 most important parameters: active mode current draw per frequency, and current draw at the different low power modes. Holding the communication as a constant (i.e. same communication protocol and EM frequency), then choosing the best MCU is ...


8

If you only want control inside the home sure it is possible. The problem is if you want to offer control from outside the home things get difficult. Neither the client or the server are likely to have a static IP, there are likely to be firewalls and/or NATs in the way. It is possible for the user to set up port forwarding/exceptions in their router/...


8

Some devices support connecting to a router through Wi-Fi Protected Setup (WPS), which is a feature of most modern routers to allow any device to connect to your network (with a limited period of time to initiate the connection) once you've pressed the WPS button on the router. The button tends to look like this: (ArnoldReinhold, Cisco router WPS button, ...


8

The problem is essentially one of receivers and of power. A "find my keys" type of beacon needs to be small enough to attach to your keychain and you probably don't want to have to regularly recharge the beacon (you wouldn't lose your keys if they're always in their charger) so that requires either: a passive technology without a battery. an active ...


8

Yes, you can send data to an ESP8266 without using a web server, but you might want use one, or use something functionally related to one. An ESP8266 is a fairly general purpose computing device with a WiFi radio and a network stack, hence, you can implement just about any reasonable protocol you care to describe in code. However, it has become quite ...


8

No, CoAP is an application layer protocol it's not dependent Basically that's the beauty behind the OSI layers. If correctly implemented you can mostly stack them however you want. As with every thing that starts with if correctly implemented that's mostly academic and some protocols fit better together with others than others do. More or less the only ...


8

There are many questions in your question, maybe more than you want, but I will give it a try. Why is there a lack of security in many IoT products? There are two reasons: New companies on the market without know-how. "Each cent counts" There are many new companies on the market. They are developing toothbrushes, hairbrushes, bulbs and so on with the ...


8

SSL/TLS works well when the "server" is at known location (a fixed hostname) that can match the CN of the certificate it presents. This doesn't work well for device on home networks (e.g. most IoT devices) because they tend to get IP addresses issued from RFC1918 blocks and do not have DNS entries. This means they can not be issued with certificates (well ...


7

Typically, IoT is expected to offer advanced connectivity of devices, systems, and services that goes beyond machine-to-machine (M2M) communications https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_of_things IoT devices go beyond inter-device communication. Take for example a TV remote, it is an embedded device which communicates with the TV through an infrared ...


7

This is an unusual use-case where the data throughput which you require is really low - range and low power are the driving factors. This points in the direction of a low data-rate, narrow band protocol (or maybe one using a spreading code, such as GPS). Looking for long-range through walls, etc. implies a low RF frequency too, 433 MHz would probably be ...


7

There are two ways that you can achieve this unless the devices you have in-home are configured to access an external server specifically to provide this function (most are). A VPN can be used to logically move your android device to inside your home network. It is possible (but unlikely) that your router provides this functionality. In practice, you need a ...


7

Basically, you trade off bandwidth, range and cost. If one of the choices does not meet your requirements for bandwidth or range, then your choice is clear. If both meet those requirements, then it is a business decision, and you would probably go with cost. Of course, this implies that you are providing both client and server. If you are, for instance, ...


7

"WiFi enabled" would describe the attribute you are looking for in those devices, but I don't know that there is a formal classification that specifically encompasses devices that are both home automation and WiFi enabled.


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