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5

Are you sure Tails supports the Orange Pi? The System requirements page implies it only supports x86_64 based hardware: https://tails.boum.org/doc/about/requirements/index.en.html


4

Some Orange Pi components are in the mainline kernel and some are not. To have a full running Linux OS, you should use armbian. If you want to use another distro than Debian/Ubuntu, you need to use Yocto in order to build your own image. There is a recipe for the Allwinner used in the Orange Pi Zero.


3

Its not very complex, you could use some thing as simple as an infra red led powered by a battery that is stuck on the wheel and a IR receiver somewhere close by such that the receiver generates a pulse every time it receives the light from the led. You can use this pulse to increment a counter. and as soon as the counter is incremented, send the data to the ...


3

I think you missed how slow LoRa is. It is very, very, very, very slow. The slowest data rate (at SF12, BW125) is just 250 bits per second. That's 31 bytes per second. Just the text of this answer would take 50 seconds to send, without counting any overhead. This full page, including contents, styles, scripts, images, etc. is over 3 MB, that would take over ...


3

You can certainly make a wifi controlled PWM fan with an arduino and a wifi module. It would be fairly easy to throw together and would probably be a fun and rewarding project. All though if you don't want to do it yourself, I would recommend looking up DC motor controllers. Those are all PWM and are fairly inexpensive. You can get one with the voltage you ...


3

There is also the luftdaten.info project which is a open-source particle sensor with its own firmware. They do a similar thing to what you proposed, only without the config button. They do so, by starting the web server per default, when the device is powered on. After a certain threshold (I think it's somewhere between 3-10 minutes), the internal web server ...


2

Inside the Sonoff, there will be an AC to DC converter like Hi-link HLK-PM03 220V to 3.3V Step-Down Buck Isolated Power Supply Module which is used to power the Wi-Fi module separately. As I have created the same Wi-Fi smart switch using a solid-state relay, ESP-12 generic module and simple LED within an AC-outlet and also created just like sonoff. If the ...


2

Most devices I bought (IP cameras, light switches, power sockets) were using ultrasonic communication behind the scenes. Have a look at brands such as Chromecast, Lisnr & Chirp. When the device is in configure mode, you have to hold your smartphone close to the device and the client app will send out an audio signal (could be audible or inaudible), with ...


2

For longer distances, I would recommend you look for a device that uses radio waves instead of Bluetooth but a word of warning, they are a bit bulkier and I'm not 100% if they make them specifically for keys but I do know a lot of the newer pet tracker are utilizing radio wave technology such was "Findster" pet tracker. If you insist on using something that'...


2

Despite this question is pretty old, it still lacks one very important thing: If it is legal to use in the specific country. Since EU regulations are more lax than FCC, most MCUs are not legally allowed to be used in e.g. US/Canada and similar countries, without the design being certified by FCC. Design choices such as antenna gain, filter attenuation, max ...


2

"If we use standard encryption algorithms, the message size will be increased tremendously to hundreds of bytes" - what do you base that on? (and what are standard encryption algorithms). AES is a fairly standard encryption algorithm which is supported by, for instance, the ESP32, which is a very widely used board . This page says Most symmetric ...


2

If you are looking for something custom on the ESP8266 end, you a likely going to want to write a program to do what you want it to do. If you are already using MQTT, then you might consider using MicroPython on the NodeMCU. The toolchain is a bit simpler, and the development iterations are a lot quicker than flashing a C program.


2

Looks like you've answered your own question :) Yes - a wifi controllable interface (likr Sonoff) hooked to act as the trigger for the contactor relay is probably your best/cheapest option. Saves you the issue of coding your own I/O control and easily manages overall power requirements.


2

You could use something like an ESP8266 with a hall sensor and a magnet. You could then view the revisions online by running a small server on the ESP.


1

One possibility would be a Shelly Button with a Shelly 1 inside. It can use its own firmware or be flashed by something like ESPHome (both are supported in Home Assistant) The setup is not cheap, though (~12€ piece)


1

You can flash the original firmware in the same way you downloaded the Tasmota one. You should have a backup of it. If you used a tool like Tasmotizer, it may have done the backup for you. It's very unlikely that a manufacturer releases the firmware for its products, unless they are open by design.


1

It used to be the case (not sure it still is) that any consumer-grade (and even some pro) APs had only space for a limited number of keys in the WiFi chip itself (often 64 IIRC). That meant that as soon as you went over that limit (and you have to count additional keys for multicast and the like), it would have to continually replace the keys in the chip, ...


1

It definitely depends on the router. You are correct in that the bottleneck will likely not be bandwidth, but with the number of simultaneous connections that the router can handle without dropping existing connections to add new ones. However the problem is more than just the number of IP addresses that can be handed out. Look for routers that use MU-...


1

There are probably a lot of different ways this is done, but here is one (note that this would require using an ESP32 rather than an ESP8266 because we need BLE): Your IoT device advertises its presence over BLE. It also advertises a service and characteristics will can be used to send it configuration information. You have your own custom app running on ...


1

You do not have to increase message size if you pick the right standard encryption algorithm for your application. You can check how it's done in the LoRaWAN protocol and apply the same methodology to any PHY protocol you want, LoRa, FSK or any other kind of modulation. LoRaWAN uses AES in CTR mode for encryption, and this mode doesn't add any overhead (if ...


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