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3

Despite this question is pretty old, it still lacks one very important thing: If it is legal to use in the specific country. Since EU regulations are more lax than FCC, most MCUs are not legally allowed to be used in e.g. US/Canada and similar countries, without the design being certified by FCC. Design choices such as antenna gain, filter attenuation, max ...


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Its not very complex, you could use some thing as simple as an infra red led powered by a battery that is stuck on the wheel and a IR receiver somewhere close by such that the receiver generates a pulse every time it receives the light from the led. You can use this pulse to increment a counter. and as soon as the counter is incremented, send the data to the ...


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I think you missed how slow LoRa is. It is very, very, very, very slow. The slowest data rate (at SF12, BW125) is just 250 bits per second. That's 31 bytes per second. Just the text of this answer would take 50 seconds to send, without counting any overhead. This full page, including contents, styles, scripts, images, etc. is over 3 MB, that would take over ...


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You can certainly make a wifi controlled PWM fan with an arduino and a wifi module. It would be fairly easy to throw together and would probably be a fun and rewarding project. All though if you don't want to do it yourself, I would recommend looking up DC motor controllers. Those are all PWM and are fairly inexpensive. You can get one with the voltage you ...


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You could use something like an ESP8266 with a hall sensor and a magnet. You could then view the revisions online by running a small server on the ESP.


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If you are looking for something custom on the ESP8266 end, you a likely going to want to write a program to do what you want it to do. If you are already using MQTT, then you might consider using MicroPython on the NodeMCU. The toolchain is a bit simpler, and the development iterations are a lot quicker than flashing a C program.


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MQTT is a great choice if the application requires the following: Transmission of data between devices or from device to a server Reliability of data transfer Capability to scale Compatibility with low-power devices Robust for unreliable Internet connections It sounds like your application has these requirements and that MQTT would be a sufficient solution....


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MQTT is a good choice for you to send the sensor data to the central server. It is light weight and scalable. You can consume the data directly from a web interface or store it in a database. You can use node-red for creating streaming pipelines and visualizations


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We're lacking quite a bit of data, but let's run a few numbers. If each message is about 1000 bytes, then 10K * 1000 * 8 / 2 = 40 Mbit/s. Not even considering the Wi-Fi part, that's quite a lot of upstream bandwidth. If each message is closer to 10 K bytes (quite possible if yous end each message as its own HTTPS request without keepalives or TLS session ...


1

It sounds like you need to run a DHCP server on your AP to hand out addresses in the 10.0.0.0/24 range. This should make sure it sends an empty Option 3 value so no default gateway is sent to the phone. This will let the phone know it can only reach devices in the 10.0.0.0/24 range via this network and it should keep it's current default route. E.g. to do ...


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I have had the same issue. I tried VPN and DNS, but could not make it working. I have had the information from another website, you have to uninstall Xiaomi Home (probably rev 6...) and install old Xiaomi home (I tried 5.6.10 from 2019) and it worked. Only thing, think to remove the automatic application update in Playstore, because during the night I got ...


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If I have understood your question correctly, you want a wifi repeater in-between the esp and the home wifi connection. You can accomplish that with off the shelf devices. (Routers that support third party firmware, devices boxed as repeaters, etc) Or you could just use another esp. (like the esp32 wroom) and this github project: https://github.com/martin-...


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One possibility would be a Shelly Button with a Shelly 1 inside. It can use its own firmware or be flashed by something like ESPHome (both are supported in Home Assistant) The setup is not cheap, though (~12€ piece)


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I got it working! It was pretty easy when you got the right idea. I use the IP's of the phones. I configured them to be static in my network. Then, I wrote a little Python script that pings both IP-addresses. If one of the two is online, TV should be turned on. If both are offline, TV should be turned off.


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Blindly you can choose Node MCU , especially ESP8266 , that’s one of the easiest wifi module that we can connect and that’s the cheapest in market,hardly you can get it for 400 Rupees and the good thing is ESP 8266 having full TCP/IP stack and required power is 3.3V ,it has 16 GPIO pins so that you can connect multiple sensors with it, don’t forget to give ...


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You can have a look at Texas Insturment's SimpleLink™ Wi-Fi® family that has a complete ecosystem, including boards, SDKs, IDEs, flashing tools, radio testing tools, etc. In general SimpleLink controllers are Arm® MCUs with built in support for various wireless technology, including Wi-Fi. Here is a quite detailed document about the low power aspect: Low-...


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