15

Apparently Smart things uses Z-Wave protocol among others like Philips Hue. Maybe you should add your devices near the SmartThings hub for it to recognize them to check if they are compatible. However, be aware of distance, Z-Wave devices tend to always "sleep" and escape the network.


14

In my opinion, "smart switches" are a natural progression of the current switch. I assume when switch-activated fireplaces first arrived people wondered "is it safe to have a fire that is activated via a mere flip of a switch?" Use common sense, and treat the smart switch with the same care as you would your current switch. Lastly, I cannot speak to your ...


13

There are a few things that really distinguish Z-Wave and ZigBee from each other. Frequency The first (as Eirik M noted) is the frequency on which they operate. Z-Wave operates within the 915 MHz ISM band. This gives it reasonable penetration of building materials (better than Wi-Fi) and good overall distance. The fact that few other household devices ...


13

There is no 'standard practice' for this sort of application to date. Simple, insecure, remote electrical switching is accepted practice - provided the switch hardware complies with the normal electrical safety regulations. Any gas-powered device ought to be designed to be safe in unattended operation, with blow-out detection, etc. so there should not be ...


12

As with all smart devices it completely depends on their security level. As such you have to evaluate the security level of the specific smart switch to determine its safety level. If the smart switch is adequately secured one could reasonably consider it a better solution because you are able to disable your fireplace from without the confines of your own ...


12

A wet sensor will not measure the same temperature as a dry sensor due to the evaporation of water from its surface and with the required latent heat being supplied by the sensor, i.e. evaporating water lowers the temperature measured. This evaporative cooling of a water-wetted (or ice-covered), ventilated surface is furthermore depending on wind speed thus ...


9

I think there is mainly one thing you should care about: Is the ZigBee solution 2.4 GHz or 868/908 MHz? The 2.4 GHz penetrates less then ~900 MHz through walls, and the 2.4 GHz shares the spectrum with Wifi, Bluetooth, the microwave oven, to mention a few. The Z-Wave is only using the 900 MHz band. Both solutions have complete network stacks, but the are ...


8

Here you have a nice list of 11 IoT protocols you need to know about. Here is a summary in case the link someday breaks Bluetooth Standard: Bluetooth 4.2 core specification Frequency: 2.4GHz (ISM) Range: 50-150m (Smart/BLE) Data Rates: 1Mbps (Smart/BLE) Zigbee Standard: ZigBee 3.0 based on IEEE802.15.4 Frequency: 2.4GHz Range: 10-100m Data Rates: ...


8

Building upon several years of deploying outdoor wireless sensor networks, I would like to add the following hint: Think ahead and do not underestimate the problems arising from humidity! I will answer your question by providing some pitfalls with humidity in outdoor devices. However, please consider these general guidelines when planning a wireless sensor ...


8

Your challenge is handling the throughput demands with channel contention. Your devices are all close enough that you need to assume they are all potential interferers to each other so you will need to use a protocol that is robust to this - probably using some sort of coordination between devices to ensure they all take a fair slice of the channel. You ...


7

Latency vs Rate a low-latency (10 Hz) type of IoT application This is a conceptual error. Latency and Rate are largely independent. You could have a system which recorded thousands of readings per second, stored them on an SD card, and once a month someone visits the remote site, extracts the card, and mails it to you - that system would have a high ...


7

The ant website has a power estimator which suggests an active 4800 baud connection requires less than 100 uA from a coin cell. I'm not too sure I trust the numbers there though, they look rather optimistic. The page does link some transmit IC data sheets though. According to this digikey article, the energy per bit is similar between ANT+ and BLE, but I ...


7

Building your own device for this use case really is the wrong approach. The industrial design to build something that will survive day to day use and be comfortable to wear with a useable battery life is likely to take longer than the study you want to run. Just buy an off the shelf fitness tracker. There are plenty that have open BLE interfaces. But if ...


7

A broker like mosquitto will run happily on the Pi and bridge to a remote broker. How much resources it will consume entirely depends on how much traffic you send through it and if you end up queuing large amounts of retained messages. Under most circumstances it's pretty low (unless you are planning on streaming video via MQTT). But this solution has the ...


7

As comments indicate there is apparently indeed a licensing and certification process involved that might indicate where some part of the price stems from. Though well known in the automation industry, ZigBee is expensive. The protocol is computationally intense and the memory footprint is large. The ZigBee Alliance requires all implementers to join ...


7

There are a number of 802.15.4 solutions which are not Zigbee, and cost less. See this article: "What’s The Difference Between IEEE 802.15.4 And ZigBee Wireless?" As I understand it, to use the label "Zigbee" you must comply with certain requirements and guarantee interoperability with other Zigbee devices. Otherwise it would be "Zigbee-like" or some such. ...


6

Please do not waste your time and make the same mistake as hundreds of research groups (including ours) made before for decades and just throw some unspecific sensors into the wild without knowing what you really want to get in the end! There is a nice paper from 2006 (!) that shares experiences from a real-world deployment. Langendoen, Koen, Aline ...


6

Referring to the list of protocols provided in Snake's answer, it seems you need a protocol with a range of 20-100m, good low-power performance (ideally passive, but I don't know of any solution), and not really much bandwidth for the carried part. In addition, you need some static nodes which can be less constrained from a power perspective. BT-LE is the ...


6

Question 2.) Are there any other ideas that anyone can think of to solve this - even crazy ideas like XSS vectors to PUSH content into the captive portal from external servers? If I may suggest, you consider using the AllJoyn framework? runs on the local network. enables devices and apps to advertise and discover each other Looking at your problem ...


6

I found a good base solution for what @Chris Stratton refers to a kept alive tcp connection: import socket # Set up a TCP/IP socket s = socket.socket(socket.AF_INET,socket.SOCK_STREAM) # Connect as client to a selected server # on a specified port s.connect(("url_to_device_n",80)) # Protocol exchange - sends and receives s.send("GET /answer_json HTTP/1.0\...


6

Have you looked at Particle.io or T-Mobile? T-Mobile offer unlimited connectivity for $25/year per SIM. They also have a web management platform, API and can optionally integrate with Twilio's platform. T-Mobile also commits to running 2G services until at least 2020: T‑Mobile supports IoT customers using 2G networks, giving them a clear roadmap from 2G ...


6

Buy sonoff switches Flash with MQTT firmware (https://github.com/arendst/Sonoff-Tasmota) Add to wifi Send MQTT messages from the Pi to control the switch You can also use something like Node-RED (comes pre installed in raspbian) and the node-red-contrib-alexa-home-skill (I wrote this node) to send the messages and have more control than just the actions ...


6

This confusing behaviour is typical. The underlying reason is that it is up to the carrier to decide what to do with the APN setting — unlike most configurations of this form, you're not actually configuring any connection setting. Instead, you're just passing to the carrier a text string. The carrier may do a number of things with the APN you've specified: ...


5

I tried hard to find out an AT command for that, but unfortunately I didn't find it. Instead I found semi new slides about m1 and m2. https://www.slideshare.net/mobile/SmallCellForum1/discussion-on-iot-technologies-cat-m1-and-nbiot-cat-m2 There it is mentioned that Verizon should soon / already have it nationwide, AT&T makes piloting in San ...


5

I don't think there are many off-the-shelf configurable end products (maybe a Kickstarter idea). The only one I found so far was Hexiware and I have no idea how complete that is. Cost wise, I think you have about the right target in mind. You absolutely want hardware which has some good eccosystem support rather than being too reliant on a custom stack from ...


5

It is still early days for NB-IoT and any hands-on with NB-IoT that is outside the large companies is only happening in lab and innovation environments. Mobile operators, such as Vodafone, and chipset manufacturers are actively developing technology and testing it. It's not mainstream enough yet for most developers to be able to try it out. There is one lab ...


5

Most modern RF standards/protocols offer or require secure pairing. The appropriate Alliances or Consortia behind the standards have taken the necessary steps in their own way: For WiFi (WPA, etc), the password is the out-of-band piece. Z-Wave and Z-Wave Plus also have an "install key" (e.g. printed on a sticker) that you need to pass to the IoT hub ...


5

There is no real difference. According to this, you are on to the definition of "mote" with your headline: "a microcontroller equipped with sensors and connectivity" - shorter: "Sensor node"


5

Jsotola is right. The cars use the distance to know when they have to close doors. In your case, you can use an extra sensor in the inside part. Maybe, an RFID or NFC tag, an ultrasonic sensor, or a laser or infrared sensors. With this element, you can detect if people are in the inside part.


4

As a software guy—and a protocol stack guy at that—I tend to look differently at this than you might. To me, these protocols are "low level" stuff (layer 1 & 2 of the OSI 7 layer model). I don't particularly care about power consumption, unless the device is battery or solar powered. In my professional life, I can leave decisions about hardware, which ,...


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