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15

You can use a spectrum analyzer to make sure that: The antenna is emitting at the correct frequency (range). The output power is the expected (theoretically calculated) output power (or it is close enough). A higher end version of a spectrum analyzer (including bit error rate analyzer) could help you further on making sure that not only the antenna but ...


13

There are a few things that really distinguish Z-Wave and ZigBee from each other. Frequency The first (as Eirik M noted) is the frequency on which they operate. Z-Wave operates within the 915 MHz ISM band. This gives it reasonable penetration of building materials (better than Wi-Fi) and good overall distance. The fact that few other household devices ...


11

There are two main approaches to characterising an antenna and its effectiveness in-system, free space and in-situ. The first will give you a best-case baseline, is less susceptible to measurement noise (especially if you have access to a large anechoic chamber), and probably works best for selecting between candidate antenna variations. In-situ measurements ...


9

I think there is mainly one thing you should care about: Is the ZigBee solution 2.4 GHz or 868/908 MHz? The 2.4 GHz penetrates less then ~900 MHz through walls, and the 2.4 GHz shares the spectrum with Wifi, Bluetooth, the microwave oven, to mention a few. The Z-Wave is only using the 900 MHz band. Both solutions have complete network stacks, but the are ...


8

The release event is more likely intended to be used as a pair with the press event, allowing you to indicate a duration. My dimmable lightwave-rf lamp control overloads up/down buttons as both on/off, and increase/decrease brightness. A short press is identified as a switch action, a long press starts a increment/decrement process which is ended by the ...


8

In order to properly test the antenna at minimum the following items are required A source antenna with the known pattern and transmitter such as a RF signal generator create known signals The test antenna with a receiver system measure and monitor the receive RF signal. In this case the z-wave device could be used receiver system. Antenna under test (AUT) ...


5

From what I'm reading you need bridges for specific devices, unless they support Z-Wave or Zigbee (may well be wrong on this...). In general, you need a "bridge" for everything - including Z-Wave and ZigBee. A bridge may be as simple as a USB dongle and some software, or it may be a stand-alone box, but there must be something to handle the radio and ...


5

The Z-Wave Alliance have a page explaining the differences pretty nicely: Z-Wave Plus™ is a new certification program designed to help consumers identify products that take advantage of the recently introduced 'Next Gen' Z-Wave hardware platform, also know as 500 Series or 5th Generation Z-Wave. [...] With the introduction of the Next-Gen, Z-Wave 500 series ...


5

As is often the case, it depends. There are many factors to consider, and a lot of options available to cover the many different use cases around. Range DigiKey suggest that you can expect the following ranges for common IoT protocols in an unobstructed environment with little interference: 5 GHz Wi-Fi: 50 m ZigBee/RF4CE: 100 m Bluetooth low energy: 100 m 2....


5

You've explicitly rejected the factory recommended way to configure the circuit, which is to have only one switch controlling the load, and using remote-only signalling switches for the others. And you're doing this on the supposition that someday one of the switches will fail; but you've only said that it would leave a switch "useless", without saying why ...


5

The rated range of Z-Wave devices in general is designed for indoor "perfect conditions" so if the max range of a device is 100 ft. that assumes no noise and no interference. If you have any other devices on similar frequencies or objects that may attenuate the signal, it most likely will never achieve that range. In an environment with a lot of devices (not ...


5

All certified Z-Wave products conform to their communication protocol. And that's what ensures interoperability. In particular, a certified product must register with a Z-Wave network controller. The latter gives out a 4 byte network / home ID to the former and also assigns to it a 1 byte node ID. The node ID ensures that each product registered to a ...


4

As a software guy—and a protocol stack guy at that—I tend to look differently at this than you might. To me, these protocols are "low level" stuff (layer 1 & 2 of the OSI 7 layer model). I don't particularly care about power consumption, unless the device is battery or solar powered. In my professional life, I can leave decisions about hardware, which ,...


4

What's the real scoop on S2 security? I studied a number of products and corresponding Z-Wave Protocol Implementation Conformance Statement issued to these products. Products that feature S2 Security are all built on Z-Wave Development Kit Version: 6.71.01 or above. For Example, refer two very similar products from same brand: The Aeotec LED Bulb 6:Multi-...


3

in the ceilling you need a relay with a controlling board of somekind. For the "remote" switches one microcontroller reading a momentary or latching switch. the remote MCU sends a message (MQTT for example) to the relay MCU that activates or deactivates the load. This is just one simple way to do it. FR


3

In-line dimmers have to be dimmers rather than switches because they have no neutral return at the switch. This makes any multi-way arrangement nigh impossible. The 'obvious' homebrew solution is a z-wave relay, and a unit to aggregate 'switch' requests into a control toggle. Probably requires an mcu or SBC to facilitate this, and this would extend to more ...


3

I know this is an older thread, but thought this may be helpful. Technically, only the Z-WAVE portion of SmartThings is illegal in Australia. The band used is unlicensed, but still managed under legislation. The band does not interfere with any licenced bands, such as mobile or TV, but can interfere with Radar and the like and as there is no ability for ...


3

BLE will be the wiser choice. Pros: You will find many ready gateway in the market. Range is variable, if you want it to be more then 20 m, you can use BLE-PA(Power Amplifier) modules, and then you can control the transmit power also for the optimization. According to your application, you can optimize for power. There is no other option I see which ...


3

Given your requirements of range, power and proven stack Z-Wave is likely suitable candidate. Low Energy, battery powered Send-and-sleep Medium range (20-30m) Ready-to-use or easily configurable gateway The data will be sent in small packets, the frequency can be for example once per 10 seconds These Z-Wave modules can serve your purpose. ...


2

Unfortunately, it doesn't look like your goal of just one hub is achievable. According to the Arlo documentation: When do I need a base station? You need a base station to connect Arlo Wire-Free and Arlo Pro Wire-Free cameras. You don't need a base station to connect Arlo Q and Arlo Q Plus cameras. They connect directly to your Wi-Fi router. It is ...


2

No – it's illegal to operate a UK or US SmartThings Hub in Australia (or any US/UK Z-Wave device). US Z-Wave devices operate at 908.42 MHz, and UK devices at 868.42 MHz. Both of these frequencies are occupied by other uses in Australia, such as mobile frequencies. It is therefore not legal to operate a SmartThings hub set to UK or US settings with a Z-Wave ...


2

If you have done anything on the ESP8266 with MQTT, and are interested in controlling devices at home, you might want to look at zigbee2mqtt. Development is pretty active on that project. I've been using all Digi zigbee hardware for the most part, but you can probably get started with a CC2531 USB stick flashed with the zigbee coordinator firmware, and a ...


1

Some additional resources on the net how to connect arduino&co with xbee. ForceTronics blog: Part 1: http://forcetronic.blogspot.com/2014/01/building-wireless-temperature-sensor.html Part 2: http://forcetronic.blogspot.com/2014/01/building-wireless-temperature-sensor_9.html


1

Vesternet claim that: The main consideration is the Z-Wave controller - if the controller is not Z-Wave Plus enabled then all devices added to that controller's network will default to acting as Z-Wave. This is because Z-Wave Plus is back-wards compatible with Z-Wave devices, when it is installed with Z-Wave devices it behaves just like a Z-Wave device as ...


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