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17

Detecting the infected device These devices-turned-botnet will still function correctly for the unsuspecting owner, apart from the occasional sluggish bandwidth, and their botnet behavior may go unnoticed indefinitely. Webroot.com: Source Code for Mirai IoT Malware Released This tells us how the device changes its behavior. Occasional sluggish bandwidth ...


17

DDoS vs. "PDoS" 1. DDoS (for reference) A conventional distributed denial of service attack (DDos) is a class of denial of service (DoS) attacks in which a distributed system (botnet) consisting of nodes controlled via some application (Mirai, LizardStresser, gafgyt, etc.) is used to consume the resources of the target system or systems to the point of ...


7

DDoSes are ephemeral. Once the attack vector is removed or the DDoS stops the device works. (Or in the case of Mirai, the rest of the internet works.) PDoSes update the device so it cannot work, ever again. Mirai used IoT devices as a DDoS source. Mirai-infected devices still worked; the DDoS aspect was in addition to their normal functionality. It wasn't ...


6

If you have any vulnerable devices on your network, you should assume they are compromised. By definition, the login credentials are public, and I believe you need to assume the firmware has been tampered with. There is no need to wait to observe communication with the command-control server or malicious activity. Clean the device now, ensure you give every ...


6

Instead of searching for an autonomous solution. You can try to automate Incapsula's tool. Unfortunately it is a service available through a webpage button, so you must open that page and click on the button autonomously. From the page source you can obtain information about the button itself. <div class="btn-toolbar"> <a class="cta-green-button ...


5

Mirai's source code has been released in public, and Jerry Gamblin has kindly created a GitHub repository so that you can easily look through the code for research/academic purposes such as this. I think you'll get the most authoritative answer by dissecting the code to find out how Mirai finds its targets, so I had a little look around and here's what I ...


5

Elaborating a bit on what Dave wrote, the main differentiating factor is that in case of DDoS bot nets the IoT devices are used as attackers, usually not even impeding the devices function in any major way. After all those attackers don't want to lose the power of having a bot net that is able of carrying out DDoS attacks on third parties. The IoT consumer ...


3

I have heard of a virus Called ShaShimi that did exactly this, but that was 20 years ago. I do not know if that is still around, or if the virus you are describing is this one.


3

Mirai attacks embedded linux. You would first need to get command line access to your IoT device. After that you can check the checksums of the read-only filesystem, and compare them to clean firmware versions. Sometimes companies have the original firmware online, or you can contact them for a copy. If you want to understand how firmware is usually packaged,...


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