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14

In my opinion, "smart switches" are a natural progression of the current switch. I assume when switch-activated fireplaces first arrived people wondered "is it safe to have a fire that is activated via a mere flip of a switch?" Use common sense, and treat the smart switch with the same care as you would your current switch. Lastly, I cannot speak to your ...


13

There is no 'standard practice' for this sort of application to date. Simple, insecure, remote electrical switching is accepted practice - provided the switch hardware complies with the normal electrical safety regulations. Any gas-powered device ought to be designed to be safe in unattended operation, with blow-out detection, etc. so there should not be ...


12

As with all smart devices it completely depends on their security level. As such you have to evaluate the security level of the specific smart switch to determine its safety level. If the smart switch is adequately secured one could reasonably consider it a better solution because you are able to disable your fireplace from without the confines of your own ...


8

The quick answer is yes, it is possible. You can add a pressure sensor and a servo-actuated valve to your gas line and sample / control them via your choice if micro-controller. You should take every precaution to do this properly - preferably with the assistance of a properly licensed contractor, since leaky gas lines can cause massive damage to life and ...


8

Regarding the humidity and temperature there are the following specifications that should be match: Problems will start above 50 °C and 95 % humidity. But below, it should be fine. The standard detecting conditions are less than the above mentioned values: They have measured the sensitivity characteristic with these conditions (fig 2 in datasheet) so I ...


8

I've not used one of these sensors, but looking at the quoted sensitivity, it would be best placed as close as possible to the source of a leak, or at a low point (many flammable gasses are denser than air, so they tend to collect in depressions at the floor space. You should not be expecting to demonstrate this particular sensor operating, I think. An ...


7

You only need to start involving qualified people for fairly major work. Minor alternations can be done yourself so long as they are done properly. What you are proposing doesn't sound like it would require notification. You can find out more about what is and isn't regulated in the Part P FAQ. Small alternations and general DIY work is specifically ...


7

Most smart plugs I have come across are Wi-Fi controlled devices. I expect the regulations would be similar to those imposed on a Wi-Fi router such as Technicolor's TG582n. RTTE Directive 1999/5/EC: Radio and Telecommunications Terminal Equipment. Commission Regulation (EC) No 1275/2008 implementing Directive 2009/105/EC: Ecodesign requirements ...


5

I would imagine the same restrictions would apply to Smart Plugs and any other electrical device equally; there does not seem to be any specific legislation that applies to IoT devices. The UK Government (which, despite the recent Brexit referendum, still respects EU law as of 2016) has published an extensive guide named Electrical equipment manufacturers: ...


3

The regulations in the UK cover fixed wiring only, as far as I know. Replacing existing fittings is generally OK, it's only new or specific locations which are regulated. So if it plugs in, it's OK. If it's hard wired, I think it needs to meet the relevant standards.


3

Another area to consider is corrosion in electrical signal paths, particularly in tropical climates close to the ocean. If the metal electrical connections are expose to the elements the conductive medium starts deteriorating cause a change in electrical signal. Therefore good mechanical packaging might be something to consider. Alternatively, in Tropical ...


1

Absolutely not. The SonOff Mini does not have a transformer power supply, and the 'switch' contacts are at half mains potential when working. This has the unfortunate side effect that if the antenna is not well insulated, a short to the antenna seems to be able to destroy the device (I assume it was a ground short, but it was in the ceiling void). Replacing ...


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